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THE TANK MUSEUM - PUBLIC AREAS, BOVINGTON, DORSET, SOUTH WEST ENGLAND, BRITAIN



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Number of Photos:
28
Sample Photo

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Location Category ID:
3000
Address: The Tank Museum, Bovington, Dorset, BH20 6JG
Telephone: 01929 405096
Email: info [at] tankmuseum.org (Replace [at] with @)
Opening Times: 1000-1700 Daily. Closed Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day.
Official Website: The Tank Museum
Other Links: Museo de Blindados de Bovington
Latitude, Longitude: 50.69501687 , -2.24241793
Location Accuracy: 7
Tanks Previously Here: Long term:
1: Sturmgeschütz III Assault Gun - Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire, East England, Britain (Until 2005 – on loan)
2: Panzerkampfwagen IV Tank - Panzermuseum, Munster, Soltau-Fallingbostel, Lower Saxony, Germany (Until 1960)
3: Leopard 1A1 Tank - The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Dorset, South West England, Britain (Tamiya Hall)
4: M3A1 Stuart Light Tank - The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Dorset, South West England, Britain (Until ca November 2011)
5: M47 Patton Tank - Royal Armoured Corps Gunnery School, Lulworth Camp, Dorset, South West England, Britain (ca1973-1987)
6: T-55 Tank - The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Dorset, South West England, Britain (Displayed in Tamiya Hall)
7: FV4202 40-ton Centurion Tank - The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Dorset, South West England, Britain (Previously on display outside)
8: FV4201 Chieftain Tank - The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Dorset, South West England, Britain (On display in museum – dates unknown)
9: Mark IV Heavy Tank - Museum of Lincolnshire Life, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, East Midlands, Britain (Dates unknown)
10: Mark V* Heavy Tank - National Armor and Cavalry Museum, Fort Benning, Muscogee County, Georgia, USA (Unconfirmed)
11: A22 Churchill Tank - Isle of Wight Military History Museum, Cowes, Isle of Wight, South East England, Britain (Until ca2005)
12: A22 Churchill Crocodile Flame-Throwing Tank - Defence College of Management and Technology, Shrivenham, Oxfordshire, South East England, Britain (ca1980-2002)
13: Churchill Bridgelayer - Royal Engineers Museum, Gillingham, Kent, South East England, Britain (ca1965-ca2009)
14: A33 Excelsior Heavy Tank - The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Dorset, South West England, Britain (On display outside – dates unknown)

Short term:
1: FV4003 Centurion AVRE 165 Engineer Vehicle - Royal Engineers Museum, Gillingham, Kent, South East England, Britain (On loan 1993-2002)


The Tank Museum is located in Bovington Camp, the main base of the Royal Armoured Corps (RAC), which is about two miles north-west of Wool in Dorset. It is the museum of the Royal Tank Regiment (RTR) and RAC and began when some twenty-six tanks (of which eight now survive) were collected together on the heath near the Camp after the First World War. These were experimental models and survivors of the War which had been saved from the scrap-heap after demobilisation. In 1923 the late Rudyard Kipling during a visit expressed disappointment to the Colonel Commandant, General Sir Hugh Elles, that so little was being done for these tanks. In 1924 a selection of them was given a place in the Driving and Maintenance Wing of the Royal Tank Corps Central Schools. This ‘museum’ was for Army instruction and was not open to the public. An equipment store was taken over in 1925 to house souvenirs and relics, and the museum itself was enlarged considerably in 1928. In this year His Majesty King George V visited the camp and its vehicle collection.
Nine vehicles arrived in 1932 from the Mechanical Warfare Experimental Establishment at Farnborough, of which only one now survives. Various experimental machines of the inter-war years were later added. The formation of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1939 from the Cavalry, Royal Tank Regiments and certain Yeomanry and Territorial units led to the scope of the existing Royal Tank Corps Museum being enlarged to cover all the regiments of the RAC. The museum was closed soon after for the duration of the Second World War. A number of the exhibits were saved from being scrapped by being used for local defence.
In 1945 the rather unsuitable buildings of the Driving and Maintenance School were again used to house about fifty vehicles. Between 1947, when the museum was first opened to the public, and 1952 a large hanger was taken over. In 1951 a collection of Second World War Allied and foreign vehicles was included when the School of Tank Technology and its vehicles moved from Chertsey to Bovington. The Alan Jolly Hall was added in 1970, and a new entry block was opened in 1983 by His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent. In 1986 a whole new hall was opened by David Trippier MP, Minister for Tourism. It contains all the First World War tanks in the museum's collection and aims to demonstrate the early evolution and development of the tank.
The RAC Museum incorporates the Royal Tank Regiment Museum, and displays a large number of tank guns and engines, and some turrets and models, as well as its very large collection of vehicles. The museum also has an extensive collection of documents, photographs and books concerned with armoured vehicles. These are housed in a library which, though not open to the general public, may be visited by appointment.

Museum Building Entrance



Location ID:
3000
Latitude, Longitude:50.69450035, -2.2429195
Location Accuracy:7



1) FV4030/4 Challenger 1 Tank British


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1374

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Unique ID: 1374
Serial Number: V3A2: “V3A2” painted on hull sides.
Registration: 05 SP 52: “05 SP 52” painted on nose and right hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: Yellow line and small yellow cross painted on hull sides.

This Challenger is displayed beside the main door to the museum. It was a fully hydrogas instrumented test rig (source: Museum Vehicle Record). A Museum photograph shows it undergoing testing with a mix of roadwheel types at Chertsey.

Linsay Road



Location ID:
3001
Latitude, Longitude:50.69537027, -2.24203974
Location Accuracy:7



2) A22 Churchill Tank British


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1376

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Unique ID: 1376
Serial Number:
Registration: T68557R: “T68557R” (not original) painted on nose and hull sides.
Name: “BOB” painted on hull sides and front.
Other Identification: Canadian flags painted on nose, hull sides and rear. Unit markings painted on nose, turret sides and rear, and hull rear.

This vehicle, the precise identity of which is not known, appears to have been completed as a Mark II but has since been altered to resemble a Mark I. It was found, seriously bogged down, in Stainburn Gate Forest near Harrogate, having presumably been abandoned there following a wartime exercise. The tank was subsequently recovered to the Museum of Army Transport at Beverley where it was tidied up, repainted and given dummy guns to create the appearance of a Mark I. With the demise of Beverley it came under the control of the National Army Museum who placed it on loan with the Military Vehicle Museum at Newcastle upon Tyne but then donated it to the Tank Museum [it was put on the museum books in 2005]. The colloquial history is that some weeks before D-Day the tank was engaged in firing on ranges in the local area (Stainburn Moor Forest), trees had not been planted on this rather boggy area of land at that time and the tank got inextricably bogged down. Because of things that were going on in preparation for D-Day, clearly resources were not available to recover it and it was left where it was. Several components and, of course, the gun, have been removed and it is assumed that these were removed on the orders of the Ministry of Defence. Some local people claim to have met the crew of the tank, they thought that they might have been Canadian and that they were last seen moving south to go across on D-Day. There are also rumours of another tank which is supposed to be bogged down in the area but no trace of it could be found. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).

King George V Road Entrance



Location ID:
3002
Latitude, Longitude:50.69589696, -2.24402457
Location Accuracy:7



3) M4A1 Sherman Grizzly Tank American / Canadian


Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2108

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Unique ID: 2108
Serial Number: ME 12 27? (source: Museum Vehicle Record).
Registration: T224878 (Canadian): “T-224878” painted on hull sides.
Name: Previously ‘WILTON’, before that ‘CRICKLADE’ painted on hull sides.
Other Identification: White diamond painted on turret sides. Canadian maple leaf emblem painted on transmission cover and left hull rear. Casting mark of General Steel on glacis picked out in white paint. (Previously painted overall in a desert sand and pink camouflage scheme).

This Grizzly came into Britain along with most others from Portugal in 1983. It was imported by Ian McGregor in North wales. He mostly sold to collectors but he also sold a few to the Army to use as hard targets, this one ending up on Sennybridge Training Area. The Tank Museum recovered it in 1985 or 6 in exchange for something else to shoot at. At that point it was missing the magneto, carburettors, driver’s seat and about 4 feet of the gun tube but otherwise it was all there and undamaged. It sat outside Bovington as a gate guardian for several years and was painted with a copy of the scheme in the famous photo of ‘Cricklade’. It then went off to Wilton where the name ‘Wilton’ was substituted for ‘Cricklade’ but it looks like the rest of the paint was not changed. It came back to Bovington recently and is in remarkable condition: it still has the un-rusted air cleaners at the back and it rolls freely. Hatches had been welded so the interior should be ok as well. Long term plan is to return to full running order to complement the twin GMC late Sherman that Bovington regularly runs now. (Source: J. Pearson/Missing-Lynx).
This Grizzly was put on the museum books in 1989. One source states that a Grizzly was sent from the Museum to the Royal Military College of Science at Shrivenham for a year with the intention of returning it afterwards to Bovington; it is presumed that this is the same Grizzly (though Shrivenham may have been mistaken for Wilton). This Grizzly was prepared in September 2011 and painted in green and Canadian markings to replace the previous desert camouflage scheme and British markings. It was installed on display beside the entrance road in October 2011.


4) FV4005 Self-Propelled Heavy Anti-Tank Gun British


Number of Photos:
18
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1375

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Unique ID: 1375
Serial Number:
Registration: 43 BA 09 (Hull registration). “07 SP 24” painted on nose and on a number plate on hull rear.
Name: “SPUD” painted on turret sides.
Other Identification:

This vehicle consists of an FV4005 turret mounted on a Centurion Mark 12 hull in May 2007 to give the appearance of an original FV4005 vehicle (source: Museum Vehicle Record). The turret was on display behind the museum car park for many years. The vehicle record cards show that the base Centurion was manufactured by Leyland and served with A Squadron 1RTR in BAOR in June 1968, A Squadron 9/12 Lancers in January 1969, QDG in December 1970, Berlin Armoured Squadron in June 1971, and was put on 2 ADS stock in December 1972. It was at 49 Field Regiment RA in November 1975, 27 Command Workshop in February 1980, Ludgershall in October 1980, and RAC Centre Bovington in September 1982 (manned by 3RTR then QRIH). In June 1998 it was gifted to DERA, and it was put on the museum books in 2005.

Tank Story Hall



Location ID:
3004
Latitude, Longitude:50.69431006, -2.24349081
Location Accuracy:7



5) Panzerkampfwagen II Tank German


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 89

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Unique ID: 89
Serial Number: 28434: chassis number.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: German crosses painted on hull side stowage boxes and hull rear. Painted overall in a grey and brown camouflage scheme (previously overall green).


6) Panther Tank German


Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 45

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Unique ID: 45
Serial Number: 129113.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Plaque fixed to glacis. German crosses painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a late-war brown and cream striped camouflage scheme (previously a green, brown and sand scheme, before that overall green).


7) Tiger Tank German


Number of Photos:
16
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 72

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Unique ID: 72
Serial Number: 250112: chassis number.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “131” painted in red on turret sides. Unit markings painted on forward hull sides. German crosses painted on hull sides. Painted overall in a sand and brown camouflage scheme.


8) Leopard Tank German


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 297

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Unique ID: 297
Serial Number: J03.
Registration: “Y-209859” (German) painted on glacis. Also “02 SP 60” (British).
Name:
Other Identification: “7218” painted on front right mud flap. “L03” painted on glacis plate. Standard unit code number “91872110”. German crosses painted on hull sides.


9) M3 Grant I Tank American / British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1559

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Unique ID: 1559
Serial Number:
Registration: T24689
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a desert sand and brown camouflage scheme with black and white edging (previously overall sand with red triangles on turret sides). Unit markings painted on nose.

This Grant was put on the museum books in 1949.


10) M4A4 Sherman Firefly Tank American / British


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1560

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Unique ID: 1560
Serial Number:
Registration: 3053416 (US): “USA W 3053416” previously painted on hull sides, T228796 (British): “T228796” previously painted on hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on nose, hull sides and right rear mud flap.

This Firefly was put on the museum books in 1949. It is painted to represent a tank of Guards Armoured Division around the time of the Battle of Arnhem, September 1944.


11) M4A2 Sherman Duplex Drive Amphibious Tank American / British


Number of Photos:
5
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1561

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Unique ID: 1561
Serial Number:
Registration: 414700.
Name:
Other Identification:

This amphibious Sherman is displayed with its flotation screen erected. A viewing window in the left side allows the tank itself to be seen.


12) M48 Patton Tank American


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1562

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Unique ID: 1562
Serial Number: 17 (source: M. Foti/AFVNDB).
Registration: 9A5213: “U S ARMY 9A 5213” painted on hull side stowage boxes and front left mud flap.
Name:
Other Identification: “U S ARMY ORDNANCE” painted on turret sides. Previously: “1-73Δ” painted on right side of glacis and “HQ6” painted on left side of glacis.

This Patton arrived at the museum in May 1969. According to the museum’s website it is an early model, a T48, however the presence of a T-shaped muzzle brake, a large driver’s hatch and track tension idlers indicate that it is not one of the earliest pilots. It is fitted with a T139 gun (number 147) manufactured by Watervliet arsenal in 1952.


13) T-34-85 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1563

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Unique ID: 1563
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “412” painted in white (previously black) on turret sides.

This Model 1945 T-34 was captured from Communist forces in 1951 during the Korean War. It was manufactured after World War II, probably at the tank plant in Omsk (source: Museum Vehicle Recor) – this fits with its 'angle-jointed' style turret, typical of the Omsk Zavod 174 factory. Its gun was manufactured at the Zavod 8 factory. It was put on the museum books in 1952.


14) T-62 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
6
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1564

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Unique ID: 1564
Serial Number: MO9 BT5371.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall desert sand.

This T-62 was captured from Iraqi forces at the time of the 1991 Gulf War and was put on the museum books in 1993. It has been fitted with RMSh track (designed for the T-72).


15) T-72M1 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1565

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Unique ID: 1565
Serial Number: AO9JN568.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This T-72M1 was in service with the former East German Army (Nationale Volksarmee, NVA). It was manufactured in 1982, and put on the museum books in 1994.


16) Carden-Loyd Mark VI Tankette British


Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1635

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Unique ID: 1635
Serial Number: MT9909: “MT9909” painted on plate on nose.
Registration: T612: “T612 1929” on plaque on hull front. “5RTC T 612” painted on forward hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: “E61” painted on rear hull sides. White concentric circles painted on nose.

This Mark VI was put on the museum books in 1952. It is missing its machine-gun and mounting.


17) Vickers 6-ton Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1566

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Unique ID: 1566
Serial Number: 1985.
Registration: T10674.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green, brown and sand camouflage scheme, as adopted by Vickers for their commercial designs. (Previously painted overall green).

The British Army never ordered any of this type, Type B, but on the outbreak of war in September 1939, it took over several of those which had been built for other nations and used them in the training role for the rest of the war. This one was saved because it was one of those taken over, and was put on the museum books in 1952. It is a mixture of Mark F hull design and Mark E mechanics. It is not fitted with its original gun and mantlet. It had previously been on display in a tableau of a Vickers-Armstrong commercial tank stand with the Vickers Dutchman light tank in the Inter-War Hall.


18) Mark VIB Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1567

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Unique ID: 1567
Serial Number: 135.
Registration: T194: “T4194” painted on hull sides. “HMC 547” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a dark and light green camouflage scheme.

This Mark VIB was built in April 1939 and was put on the museum books in 1949. It has been painted with the markings of the 4th/7th Dragoon Guards serving with 2nd Infantry Division in the British Expeditionary Force, France 1940.


19) FV101 Scorpion CVR(T) Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1568

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Unique ID: 1568
Serial Number:
Registration: 00SP97: “00 SP 97” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green and black camouflage scheme (previously painted overall in a white and black camouflage scheme).

This Scorpion was acquired from the Military Vehicle Engineering Establishment, Chobham Lane, Chertsey in July 1973.


20) Little Willie Tank British


Number of Photos:
16
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1569

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Unique ID: 1569
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “LITTLE WILLIE ~1915~” painted on hull sides. Plaque fixed on nose.

Little Willie was the first tank ever built, though it was constructed from non-armoured metal plate, and was also the only example of its type produced. It was originally created as the Number 1 Lincoln Machine during August and September 1915. However, the tracks and suspension behaved poorly in tests, so it was rebuilt with longer, curved tracks and tested in the new form in Burton Park, Lincoln in December 1915. Meanwhile an improved design was being worked on. Little Willie took part in two further demonstrations, on 29th January and 8th February 1916 at Hatfield Park, Hertfordshire. Both served to prove that only the competing tank design, Big Willie, was able to match War Office requirements. Little Willie was used for driver training for a while, before being removed to Lincoln and later to Bovington as part of the original Tank Museum collection. It was one of the original tanks preserved on the heath at Bovington, and it was used during the Second World War as a local strongpoint. It was put on the museum books in 1949.
Little Willie is displayed in the Museum on a turntable; it not fitted with tail wheels, its front plate is damaged and it is missing its floor, engine, fuel tank and most of its interior fittings. A plaque fixed on the nose reads:

WM. FOSTER & CO. LTD.
ENGINEERS
LINCOLN.


21) Medium Mark A Whippet Tank British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1570

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Unique ID: 1570
Serial Number:
Registration: A259: “A259” painted on fighting compartment sides.
Name: “Caesar II”.
Other Identification: “9” painted on fighting compartment sides. White/red/white stripes painted on forward track guards.

This Whippet was commanded by Lieutenant C. H. Sewell at Frémicourt in France in August 1918. In full view of the enemy, and regardless of his personal safety he rescued the crew of an overturned tank. Returning under heavy fire to aid his driver he was killed. For his bravery he was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.
This Medium Mark A became one of the original tanks preserved on the heath at Bovington (though it was not put on the museum books until 1949). It was previously housed in a special display giving the impression of a corner of Foster’s factory in Lincoln where the first tanks were built.
A plate on the nose reads:

LIEUT. C.H. SEWELL COMMANDED THIS
TANK AT FREMINCOURT IN AUG. 1918.
IN FULL VIEW OF THE ENEMY, AND
REGARDLESS OF HIS PERSONAL
SAFETY HE RESCUED THE CREW OF
AN OVERTURNED TANK, RETURNING
UNDER HEAVY FIRE TO AID HIS
DRIVER HE WAS KILLED. FOR HIS
BRAVERY HE WAS POSTHUMOUSLY
AWARDED THE VICTORIA CROSS.


22) Medium Mark II* Tank British


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1571

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Unique ID: 1571
Serial Number: ML8642: “ML8642” painted on nose.
Registration: T199: “T199” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: “E16” painted on rear hull sides. White diamonds painted on turret sides and nose.

This Mark II* was one of 13 built under a contract issued on 5 January 1926. It was employed as a training tank at Bovington in the early years of the Second World War. It was put on the museum books in 1949. It is in running order and was restored in 1984/85, along with the Tetrarch Light Tank and the Praying Mantis Carrier, by Vickers Defence Systems at their Armstrong Works, Scotswood Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.


23) A13 Cruiser Mark III Tank British


Number of Photos:
6
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1572

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Unique ID: 1572
Serial Number:
Registration: T4425, though “T9143” painted on hull front and rear turret sides. Other sources state “T5245”.
Name: “AGILITY” painted on forward turret sides.
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on nose and turret sides. Painted overall in a light green and dark green camouflage scheme (previously overall green).

This A13 was put on the museum books in 1949. It is painted to represent the tank commanded by one of the museum’s volunteers (Ron Huggins) of 10th Royal Hussars in 1st Armoured Division with the British Expeditionary Force in France, 1940. The 1st Armoured Division operated mainly in western France and fought on in June 1940 after the Dunkirk evacuation until the surviving personnel were evacuated to Britain at the end of June 1940. The turret of this A13 has been reworked to approximately Cruiser Tank Mark IV / A13 Mark II standard with the addition of extra spaced armour plating on the turret front and sides. This armour, however, is not entirely in the standard arrangement as the front corners of the turret have been undercut.


24) A27M Cromwell Tank British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1573

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Unique ID: 1573
Serial Number:
Registration: T190003: “T190003” painted on nose and rear plate. “190003” painted on left turret side.
Name:
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on hull front and rear.

This Mark IVD was put on the museum books in 1949. It is displayed in the markings of the reconnaissance regiment of the 1st Polish Armoured Division, North West Europe, 1944-45.


25) Centurion Crocodile Flame-Throwing Tank British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1574

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Unique ID: 1574
Serial Number:
Registration: 03 ZR 71 and T351770: “03 ZR 71” painted on nose, turret sides and hull rear.
Name: “ARROMANCHES” painted on right side stowage box. “PEARL” painted in front of driver’s hatch. “LILY” painted on gun barrel sides.
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on front mud flaps, hull rear, turret rear and fronts of turret side stowage boxes. (Previously painted overall sand with a black stripe around the turret, presumably as a tank in the Suez Campaign).

This Centurion is a Mark 3. It is missing its side-skirts, and is displayed in the markings of a tank of 3 Troop, C Squadron, 1st Royal Tank Regiment, part of the Commonwealth Division, during the Korean War. Commanded by Sergeant A Wallace, Military Medal, the tank depicted participated in a fiercely contested action defending a location called ‘The Hook’ against Chinese forces in Korea in May 1953. Sergeant Wallace was awarded his Military Medal for his bravery during this action.
While painted as a Korean War veteran, this tank was in fact the prototype Centurion Crocodile flame throwing tank; a type that never entered production. It was put on the museum books in 1970.


26) FV4201 Chieftain Tank British


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1575

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Unique ID: 1575
Serial Number:
Registration: 05 EB 65: “05 EB 65” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: Stylised image of a tank painted on nose. Painted overall in a green and black camouflage scheme.

This Chieftain is displayed on a section of bridge from a bridgelayer tank. It is a Mark 11C with Stillbrew armour around the turret front. It was previously a gate guardian at the Armoured Trials and Development Unit (ATDU). The museum’s Record for this vehicle shows it was issued from Ludgershall and then had a long list of users, nearly all in BAOR, including 13/18H (1969), 2RTR (1972), 4RTR (1975), QRIH (1982), 2RTR (1984), 1RTR (1985) before being a gate guardian from 1989 to 1998. It was put on the museum books in 2006.


27) FV4034 Challenger 2 Tank British


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1576

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Unique ID: 1576
Serial Number:
Registration: 06SP91: “06 SP 91” painted on nose and right rear hull.
Name:
Other Identification: “V5” in white triangle painted on nose.

This is the V5 prototype of the Challenger 2 series, a pre-production trials vehicle.


28) Mark II Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1577

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Unique ID: 1577
Serial Number:
Registration: 785: “785” previously (now “285”) painted on hull front.
Name: “THE FLYING SCOTSMAN” painted on forward hull sides. “HMLS Dragonfly” for a time.
Other Identification: “F53” painted on forward hull sides. Painted overall in a camouflage scheme.

This Mark II is missing its left-hand sponson, allowing the interior to be viewed. It was one of the original tanks preserved on the heath at Bovington (though it was not put on the museum books until 1949). It was built as a Male tank and took part in the battle of Arras, April 1917. Various features, in particular the hinged hatch on the cab roof and internal modifications, indicate that it subsequently served in the supply role. It returned to the UK after the war and was exhibited as a gate guardian at Chertsey for some years. Around this time it was modified to resemble a Mark I, complete with tail wheel assembly and fitted with sample Male and Female sponsons. In this guise it subsequently came to the Museum, bearing the name ‘HMLS Dragonfly’. With the arrival of the Mark I from Hatfield, it reverted to a Mark II, remaining a hermaphrodite, and was later renamed ‘Flying Scotsman’ when the lettering was detected beneath layers of paint (curiously there is no trace of the name ‘Flying Scotsman’ in 6th Battalion records).


29) A12 Matilda II Tank British


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1578

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Unique ID: 1578
Serial Number: D3993/88.
Registration: T10459: “T10459” painted on hull sides.
Name: “GOLDEN MILLER” painted on front hull sides.
Other Identification: Painted overall in a sand, dark blue and light blue camouflage scheme (previously overall sand).

This Matilda was built as part of Contract T7717, dated 26th August 1939, part of an order for fifty tanks. It is of the first production type, with AEC diesel engines, but with BESA 7.92mm instead of Vickers machine-guns of earlier models. It was manufactured by the North British Locomotive Company in May 1941. It was put on the museum books in 1949. It is currently painted in the colours of the tank commanded by Lt. Colonel H.R.B. Foote when he won the Victoria Cross in Libya in 1941. It is in running order and took part in Tankfest 2006.


30) A22 Churchill Tank British


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1579

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Unique ID: 1579
Serial Number:
Registration: 33 ZR 81, previously T347848/M: “T347848/M” painted on nose and side air intakes and engraved on plaque.
Name:
Other Identification: Plaque fixed on turret front. Unit markings painted on nose and hull rear. Towing a trailer.

This Churchill Mark VII was the last Churchill Mark VII to be built; it came straight from the factory to the Museum and, in terms of mileage, is virtually brand new. It was put on the museum books in 1949. It has a plaque on the front of the turret that reads:

CHURCHILL VII
T347848/M
THE LAST TANK OFF THE PRODUCTION LINE
BUILT BY
VAUXHALL MOTORS LIMITED
LUTON, BEDS.

It is painted with the markings of the 34th Armoured Brigade in Normandy in the summer of 1944. It is displayed as though it were a Churchill Crocodile flamethrower tank, complete with towed fuel trailer, but has never been fitted with a flamethrower.


31) Renault FT Light Tank French


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1580

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Unique ID: 1580
Serial Number:
Registration: 66016: “66016” painted on nose and suspension frames.
Name:
Other Identification: “13” painted on hull sides.

This FT is fitted with a one-piece cast turret with central cupola and hatch, a cast steel driver's visor, and a swivel-mounted machine gun. It was built at Billancourt-Seine in December 1917. It appears to have been part of the Imperial War Museum collection after the First World War and arrived at the Tank Museum as part of an exchange of exhibits in 1965. The tail skid turned up about 20 years later, having been discovered in a store at IWM Duxford. A plate on the front reads “NON PROTÉGÉ” and indicates that the hull is unarmoured, fabricated from mild steel; 150 of these were produced and equipped with a cast turret mounting an 8mm Hotchkiss machine-gun, they were used for training. As received it had nothing inside at all; no driving controls, seats, turret fittings or mechanical components.
It is currently displayed with the left-hand suspension removed.


32) Char B1-bis Heavy Tank French


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1581

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Unique ID: 1581
Serial Number: 36: “36” stamped on maker’s plate.
Registration: 30002: “30002” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: Spade symbol in white square painted on left turret side. Painted overall in a German late-war camouflage scheme.

This B1 was manufactured by Renault in 1938. It was issued to 1st Platoon, 1st Company, Panzer Abteilung 213, Panzer Division Schweizingen for service in the Channel Islands and was captured on Jersey at the end of the war. Panzer Abteilung 213 was formed in the autumn of 1941 to operate French tanks, and arrived in Jersey and Guernsey in March and April 1942 on the SS Derindje and SS Livadia. This tank was number 114. The regiment never fired a shot in anger, although many of its recruits fought in other panzer regiments. The tanks were returned to France in May 1946, although this one was sent to the School of Tank Technology in Britain before being moved to the Tank Museum. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).
This Char B1 was put on the museum books in 1951. It went on a six month loan to the Jersey War Tunnels museum in February 2008.

World War I / George Forty Hall



Location ID:
3006
Latitude, Longitude:50.69501007, -2.24259227
Location Accuracy:7



33) Mark I Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1267

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Unique ID: 1267
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name: “Clan Leslie” (not original).
Other Identification: “C19” painted on forward hull sides.

The Mark I was the first production tank. One hundred and fifty were built, half of them Male (armed with 6pdr guns) and half of them Female (armed with machine guns). This is the only one that has survived; it is a Male. It was given to the Marquess of Salisbury in gratitude for the use of his Hatfield Park estate for the secret acceptance trials of the first tank, in the presence of the King and Lord Kitchener. Unfortunately, exposed to the elements and vandalism, the tank fell into a state of disrepair, and corrosion led to one of the gun sponsons falling off. The tank stood on a plinth in the park for exactly 50 years to the day, before being moved to Bovington. It has a commemorative plaque that reads:

THE HATFIELD TANK
     THIS MARK 1 TANK WAS ORIGINALLY PLACED IN HATFIELD PARK ON 8TH MAY 1919 AS A PRESENTATION BY THE ARMY COUNCIL TO JAMES, 4TH MARQUESS OF SALISBURY, K.G., TO COMMEMORATE THE SECRET TRIALS AND INSPECTION THERE BY HM. KING GEORGE V IN FEBRUARY 1916 OF THE FIRST TYPE OF TANK APPROVED FOR THE BRITISH ARMY IN THE GREAT WAR

     AFTER 50 YEARS AT HATFIELD IT WAS PRESENTED BY ROBERT 5TH MARQUESS OF SALISBURY, K.G., P.C., TO THE R.A.C. TANK MUSEUM, AND WAS MOVED THERE ON 7TH MAY 1969.


It was equipped with the short six-pounder guns and small diameter gun shields from a later type of tank, was damaged at the rear and lacked the steering tail assembly and hydraulic apparatus. When it arrived at the Museum it received the hydraulics and tail from the museum’s Mark II tank and had the appearance of the guns restored cosmetically with wood. Originally displayed in grey, with the ‘Russian’ inscription, it was later repainted to represent the tank ‘Clan Leslie’ of ‘C’ Company of the Heavy Branch, the Machine Gun Corps, as it appeared during the Somme battle on 15 September 1916, complete with a replica of the 'bomb-proof' roof. It is displayed in a tableau, crushing a machine gun emplacement.


34) Mark IV Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1268

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Unique ID: 1268
Serial Number: 2324. “2324” painted on rear hull sides.
Registration: “102” painted on forward hull sides.
Name: “EXCELLENT” previously painted on left hull side.
Other Identification: Three plaques fitted on nose.

This Mark IV is a Male and was built in 1917. It is numbered ‘2324’ which indicates that it was part of the batch of 101 built by Fosters in the sequence 2300 to 2400. It was presented by the Tank Corps Training Centre to H.M.S. Excellent, Portsmouth, for assistance given in training in 6pdr gunnery during World War I. In 1940 a young naval officer got it running again in case the Germans invaded. It served as part of H.M.S. Excellent’s Royal Naval Battalion in the defence of Portsmouth, though apparently its only action was to damage a private car. It has three plaques on its nose that read as follows:

PRESENTED BY
TANK CORPS TRAINING CENTRE
H.M.S. EXCELLENT WHALE ISLAND
IN RECOGNITION AND APPRECIATION OF THE GREAT ASSISTANCE
GIVEN IN TRAINING IN GUNNERY (6 PDR.)
136 OFFICERS 2413 OTHER RANKS
OF THE TANK CORPS.
WORLD WAR I


WORLD WAR II.
SERVED AS PART OF H.M.S. EXCELLENT’S
ROYAL NAVAL BATTALION IN THE DEFENCES OF PORTSMOUTH AT
A TIME WHEN WEAPONS WERE SCARCE AND THE
THREAT OF NAZI INVASION WAS VERY REAL.


1971
PRESENTED BY HMS EXCELLENT, WHALE ISLAND, TO RAC CENTRE
AND RESTORED TO ORIGINAL CONDITION BY CRAFTSMEN OF
18 COMMAND WORKSHOP REME, 1974


When the tank was originally presented to HMS Excellent on 1 May 1919 it was mounted on a concrete plinth overlooking the parade ground, and emblazoned on its side was its new name ‘Excellent’. In 1940 a young subaltern in the RASC worked on it and returned it to running order. It became operational in the RN battalion allocated to the defence of Portsmouth and regularly drove out of Whale Island to Southsea Common and back. Eventually after a number of breakdowns and with more modern weapons becoming available it was returned to retirement on its concrete base. In 1969, under an RN Engineer Lieutenant, work began on it again. With work partially completed it was decided to present it back to Bovington as the best way to preserve it for the future. After restoration by REME it was officially handed over from the Royal Navy to the Army on 29 May 1975 outside the Armour School, in the presence of RN and Army dignitaries and junior leaders. (Source: Memorials in Portsmouth).
From that year it did not move under its own power again until the summer of 1984 when it was restored to running order by the museum in order to take part in a BBC television programme. It is displayed with its sponson doors open so the interior can be viewed.
For many years the museum had another Mark IV on display outside. This was donated a few years ago to the City of Lincoln.


35) Mark V Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1269

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Unique ID: 1269
Serial Number:
Registration: “9199” painted on rear hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: “H41” painted on forward hull sides. White/red/white stripes painted on forward hull sides and roof. Painted overall brown (previously a green and black camouflage scheme).

This Mark V is a Male and was built in January 1918. According to the museum’s records it was manufactured by Birmingham Railway Carriage Company; however, it is not clear what the evidence is for this. Other sources indicate that all Mark V tanks were built by Metropolitan Carriage and Wagon. This example was issued in July 1918 to 8th Battalion Tank Corps, the first tank battalion to receive the new Mark V, and had the number “H41”. In 5th Tank Brigade, it took part in the last British offensive of the First World War, from 8th August to 11th November 1918, Armistice Day. It was commanded by 2nd Lieutenant H. A. Whittenbury from 8th to 10th August, in support of 4th Australian Division south of the Somme, for which Whittenbury won a Military Cross. On 23rd August, 2nd Lieutenant J. G. De Courcy was the tank commander during the attack on Estrees; and on 29th September at Bellicourt the tank was grazed by a field gun shell on the left front horn which broke a track. Lieutenant T. R. Harding was in command.
In 1921, the tank went to 4th Battalion Tank Corps, returning to Bovington in 1925. Used by Central Schools for demonstrations, recovery and towing, it was on work-shops strength for the Second World War, coming into the museum in 1954 – the year of its last overhaul. Apart from replacing some exhaust valves and piston rings, and fitting an electric starter, no major work was needed to put it in running order. It went to the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR) on 14 July 1967 to march past Her Majesty the Queen when she took the 50th Anniversary Parade of the Royal Tank Regiment, of which she is Colonel-in-Chief. In 1985 it underwent minor restoration, and was then repainted after having its paint stripped. It then took part in the parade on 12 July 1985 when new Standards were presented to the Royal Tank Regiment by Her Majesty the Queen. The parade took place at Sennelager, near Paderborn, West Germany.


36) Mark V** Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1270

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Unique ID: 1270
Serial Number:
Registration: T10704.
Name: “OL’FAITHFUL” painted on forward hull sides.
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green and brown camouflage scheme.

This Mark V** is a Female. According to the museum’s records it was manufactured by Metropolitan Carriage Company; however, it is not clear what the evidence is for this. Other sources indicate that all Mark V** tanks were built by Foster’s of Lincoln. It served for some time in the early 1920s at the Experimental Bridging Establishment, a Royal Engineers depot at Christchurch in Dorset, and was adapted for engineering tasks. This involved fitting extra brackets to the front, installing a hydraulic pump driven from the engine, and at one stage removing the top of the commander’s cab thus reducing the height by about nine inches. It was then able to carry and lay a bridge and place demolition charges, trail anti-mine rollers and serve as a field crane. It still shows some traces of this conversion. It was one of the original tanks preserved on the heath at Bovington. It is displayed with its side doors open so the interior can be viewed.


37) Mark VIII Liberty Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1271

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Unique ID: 1271
Serial Number:
Registration: “12007” painted on rear hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: White/red/white stripes painted on forward hull sides.

This was one of the six British production examples of the Mark VIII. It was built in October 1918 by the North British Locomotive Company of Glasgow. All but the pilot model were transferred direct from the factory to Wool by rail a few months after the Armistice, driven from the station to Bovington camp, and then dumped on the heath at Bovington (source: Chamberlain & Ellis/Tank Mark VIII). They were eventually all scrapped except this one which was retained for the museum. It was put on the museum books in 1949. For many years it was displayed outside, in front of the museum. It is currently displayed with its right door open so the interior can be viewed.


38) Mark IX Armoured Personnel Carrier British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1272

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Unique ID: 1272
Serial Number:
Registration: 936. “936” painted on rear hull sides and hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “IC 15” painted on forward hull sides and nose.

Only 23 of these vehicles were ever produced, all but 3 after the end of the First World War. This Mark IX was one of the original tanks preserved on the heath at Bovington (though it was not put on the museum books until 1949). For many years it was displayed outside, in front of the museum. It is currently displayed with its right door open so the interior can be viewed.

Interwar / Alan Jolly Hall



Location ID:
3008
Latitude, Longitude:50.69504575, -2.24283099
Location Accuracy:7



39) Mark IIA Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1631

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Unique ID: 1631
Serial Number:
Registration: T948: “T948” painted on front left of glacis plate.
Name:
Other Identification: Red triangle painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a sand and brown camouflage scheme (previously overall green). “3rd Bn R.T.C.” previously painted on left hull side.

According to the museum’s records this tank was manufactured by the Royal Ordnance Factory at Woolwich; however, it is not clear what the evidence is for this. Other sources indicate that all Mark IIA tanks were built by Vickers. It was put on the museum books in 1952, and was a static display at Tankfest 2006.
The contracts book records the original engine serial as 7619, later replaced by WOG 50. It is now missing. This tank has the No. 1 Mark II turret, with air louvres along the sides, but no anti-splash baffles. It has the long, 'fish tailed' silencer characteristic of the Rolls-Royce-engined vehicles. There were 29 tanks in the contract. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).


40) Vickers Model 1936 Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
6
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1628

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Unique ID: 1628
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green, brown and sand camouflage scheme.

Forty Vickers light tanks (Model 1936) on order for the KNIL, the army of the Dutch East Indies, were taken over by the War Office on completion in 1939 and were used for training by the British Army for the duration of the war. They were known unofficially as ‘Dutchmen’ to the British. This example was presumably preserved because it was one of this batch. It was put on the museum books in 1952. It was previously on display in a tableau with the museum’s Vickers 6-ton light tank.


41) L1E3 Amphibious Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1629

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Unique ID: 1629
Serial Number: M120.
Registration: T2430. FME 985. “T2430” painted on superstructure sides. “FME 985” painted on nose and rear hull.
Name:
Other Identification: “MWEE 1367” in a white square painted on turret rear. Painted overall in a green and brown camouflage scheme.

This amphibious tank was designed and built by Vickers-Armstrong Ltd in May 1939 at their Elswick Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. It was the only example built. It was submitted for trials during June 1939 but the type did not enter production. It spent the next few years in reserve and was then subjected to more tests after the war. It shows some signs of damage, particularly to the rear left buoyancy tank. It has ‘MWEE’ painted on the turret and is presumed to have undergone at least some of its trials at the Mechanical Warfare Experimental Establishment at Aldershot, Hampshire. It was put on the museum books in 1951.


42) Vickers D3E1 Wheel-cum-Track Tank British


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1633

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Unique ID: 1633
Serial Number:
Registration: T836: “T836” previously painted on hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: “ML8719”, “MWEE 96” and “8b” previously painted on forward hull sides. Plaque fitted on nose.

During the 1920s Vickers made various attempts to produce vehicles capable of moving on either tracks or wheels. This led in 1928 to the construction of two prototypes of a wheel-cum-track tank, the D3E1. The first prototype transferred from wheels to tracks by raising its wheels so allowing the tracks to reach the ground. The second prototype had its tracks attached to the hull sides through slides, and transferred from wheels to tracks by lowering the track frames to the ground. This was the second of the two prototypes built. It was delivered on 12 May 1928 and tested at the Mechanical Warfare Experimental Establishment (MWEE) at Aldershot later that year. It was rather top-heavy and when seen driving on wheels was likened to a ‘skyscraper on roller skates’. It was sent back to its makers for repair and modification. It was transferred to the Royal Tank Corps at Bovington on 19 October 1933, and was put on the museum books in 1949. It is not fitted with any armament, and is missing its engine. It is displayed with Perspex windows in the sides so that the interior can be viewed.
It has a plaque on the front that reads:

VICKERS ARMSTRONGS
LIMITED
RIVER DON WORKS
1928
SHEFFIELD


43) A1E1 Independent Tank British


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1632

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Unique ID: 1632
Serial Number:
Registration: T1020: “T1020” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green and brown camouflage scheme (previously overall green).

This A1E1 was the only one built. It took part in a firepower demonstration for a conference of the Prime Ministers of British Dominions in November 1926. Trials at Farnborough (presumed to have been at the nearby MWEE at Aldershot) revealed that it was very difficult to steer, due primarily to long ground contact and narrow hull. It was abandoned in 1935 and sent to the Royal Tank Corps at Bovington. It was reputedly used as part of the defences of Bovington Camp in the summer of 1940. It found its way to the museum in 1949.


44) Stridsvagn m/40L Tank Swedish


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1634

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Unique ID: 1634
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “335” painted on turret sides and rear hull. Swedish flags painted on hull sides.

This m/40L was presented by the Swedish Government in 1960.

World War 2



Location ID:
3010
Latitude, Longitude:50.695217, -2.24341
Location Accuracy:7



45) Kleine Panzerbefehlswagen Command Vehicle German


Number of Photos:
19
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 16

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Unique ID: 16
Serial Number: “52487۞” and “15118” stamped into glacis.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “I03” painted on superstructure sides. Painted overall in a grey and brown camouflage scheme (previously painted overall desert sand).


46) Panzerspähwagen Luchs (Ausf L) Tank German


Number of Photos:
17
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 92

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Unique ID: 92
Serial Number: 200164.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “4121” (previously “4114”) painted on turret sides. “VSC LKLI 13000Kg” painted on front left turret side. German crosses painted on side stowage boxes and hull rear. Painted overall in a green, sand and brown camouflage scheme (previously overall green).

This Lynx served with 1 Kompanie, Panzer Aufklarung Abteilung of 9th Panzer Division, which had 26 Luchs on 1 July 1944. They were used in Normandy for a short time but then withdrew to Aachen and the Ruhr. This example was probably captured at Falaise or elsewhere in Normandy. It was put on the museum books in 1951. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).


47) Panzerkampfwagen III Tank German


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 109

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Unique ID: 109
Serial Number: 74375: chassis number.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “7” painted on turret sides. German crosses painted on hull sides. Painted overall sand.


48) Panzerkampfwagen III Tank German


Number of Photos:
18
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 112

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Unique ID: 112
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “832” painted on turret sides. ‘Stalking Tiger’ insignia painted on hull front and rear. German crosses painted on hull sides. Painted overall pale green (previously painted overall in a green and sand camouflage scheme).


49) Sturmgeschütz III Assault Gun German


Number of Photos:
18
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 126

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Unique ID: 126
Serial Number:
Registration: “Ps531-44” (Finnish) painted on superstructure front.
Name: “Maija” painted on driver’s visor (previously “Ulla” painted on the superstructure sides).
Other Identification: Three large wooden logs fastened to superstructure sides.


50) Panzerkampfwagen IV Tank German


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 156

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Unique ID: 156
Serial Number: 80732.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “419” painted on turret sides. Unit markings painted on hull front and rear. German crosses painted on hull sides. Painted overall in a sand and green camouflage scheme (previously overall sand).


51) Jagdpanther Tank Destroyer German


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 59

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Unique ID: 59
Serial Number: 303101: chassis number (source: L. Archer).
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Plaque fixed to glacis. German crosses painted on superstructure sides. Painted overall in a late-war sand, green and brown ‘ambush’ camouflage scheme.

This is a late production Jagdpanther with a two-piece gun barrel and a bolted mantlet.


52) Tiger II Tank German


Number of Photos:
15
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 214

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Unique ID: 214
Serial Number: V2.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “300” painted in black on turret sides. German crosses painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a sand, green and brown camouflage scheme.

This is a King Tiger with a ‘Porsche’ turret.


53) Tiger II Tank German


Number of Photos:
16
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 215

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Unique ID: 215
Serial Number: 280093.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “104” painted in grey on turret sides. German crosses painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a sand, green and brown camouflage scheme.

This is a King Tiger with a ‘Henschel’ turret.


54) Jagdtiger Tank Destroyer German


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 222

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Unique ID: 222
Serial Number: 305004: chassis number.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Jagdtiger was one of a small number of examples that were built with Porsche suspension. This had eight roadwheels each side compared to the nine of the usual Henschel suspension.


55) Hetzer Tank Destroyer German / Czech


Number of Photos:
16
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 242

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Unique ID: 242
Serial Number: 322111: chassis number, “322111” painted on glacis.
Registration:
Name: “max” painted on right side of mantlet.
Other Identification: “111??” or similar stamped into plate on glacis. Painted overall in a green, brown, cream and grey camouflage scheme.


56) M3 Stuart Light Tank American


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1926

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Unique ID: 1926
Serial Number: 759: “759” stamped into front and rear towing lugs.
Registration: EB11209 (Brazilian): “EB11-209” painted on nose, superstructure sides and rear hull.
Name:
Other Identification: Exército Brasileiro insignia painted on turret sides. Plaque attached to light cluster on front left track guard.

There are no original M3 tanks from British service in the museum collection. This example was supplied by the Brazilian government and is displayed here in recognition of the fact that Brazilian troops served with the Allies in Italy. It is a late production M3, with a turret similar to that used on the M3A1 but without a turret basket – a Stuart Hybrid. It is fitted with a seven cylinder air-cooled Guiberson radial Diesel engine. It has a plaque that reads as follows:

THIS TANK WAS KINDLY PRESENTED
BY THE BRAZILIAN ARMY
AND WAS DELIVERED TO THE UK
BY THE BRAZILIAN AIR FORCE
30-APRIL-1990


57) M5A1 Stuart Light Tank American


Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1927

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Unique ID: 1927
Serial Number:
Registration: “T271197”.
Name: “HOTHEAD” painted on hull sides
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green, brown and cream camouflage scheme (previously overall green).

The M5A1 was used extensively by the British and US armies and the US Marine Corps; this one was put on the museum books in 1949 and is painted to represent a US Marine Corps tank.


58) M22 Locust Airborne Light Tank American


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1928

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Unique ID: 1928
Serial Number:
Registration: “T158979” painted on nose and hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: “1” in white square painted on turret sides. Unit markings painted on nose and rear hull. White stars painted on turret sides.

This Locust was put on the museum books in 1949.


59) M24 Chaffee Light Tank American


Number of Photos:
16
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1929

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Unique ID: 1929
Serial Number: Some numbers are visible stamped into the front left superstructure but are too heavily painted over to be deciphered.
Registration: T330533: “T330533” painted on side stowage boxes.
Name: “TRIGGER HAPPY” painted on turret sides.
Other Identification: 7th Armoured Division markings painted on nose and rear hull. Yellow diamond markings painted on turret sides.

This M24 was put on the museum books in 1951. It has its transmission cover on the glacis plate removed to display the controlled differential steering mechanism, and its engine cover lifted to display the engine (both covers have been replaced with Perspex sheets).


60) M4A1 Sherman Tank American


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1930

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Unique ID: 1930
Serial Number:
Registration: “T74195” painted on hull sides.
Name: “MICHAEL” cast into plaques fixed to hull sides.
Other Identification:

This M4A1 was the first Sherman to be shipped to England during the Second World War and was one of the first ever built; it is probably the oldest surviving Sherman. It has a turret-top main armament sight, front hatch vision slots, twin fixed machine guns in the hull front, and M3 Tank type suspension. It was made of non-ballistic steel at Lima Locomotive Works in January 1942. It was named MICHAEL in honour of Michael Dewar and when it arrived in London it was displayed on Horse Guards Parade as the first Sherman tank to be delivered under the Lend-Lease scheme. It was put on the museum books in 1955.
There is a photograph of this tank on the Bovington website captioned ‘E1955.32 - M4A1 Sherman II Michael - Jack Oldings Hatfield’. It is therefore presumed that at some point it travelled to Jack Olding & Company which was based at Hatfield in Hertfordshire. Oldings were agents for American bulldozer and tractor manufacturers, and during the War were also involved in readying imported tanks, including US Grants and Shermans and Canadian Rams.


61) M4A4 Sherman Crab Mark II Mine Flail American / British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1931

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Unique ID: 1931
Serial Number:
Registration: “T148090” painted on hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on right-hand boom. Operational markings painted on hull sides.

This Crab is based on a late-production M4A4 and was put on the museum books in 1949. It carries the markings of a Sherman Crab of the Westminster Dragoons. They landed in King Sector on Gold Beach on D-Day and were still operating, as a flail regiment, when the war in Europe came to an end.


62) M10 Achilles Tank Destroyer American / British


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1932

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Unique ID: 1932
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on nose and rear hull. Painted overall in winter whitewash camouflage (previously overall green).

This is an Achilles IIC, an M10A1 fitted with a 17pdr gun. It was acquired from Belgium. It was put on the museum books in 1983.


63) M26 Pershing Tank American


Number of Photos:
17
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1933

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Unique ID: 1933
Serial Number:
Registration: T345713 (British, source: Tank Museum Record).
“USA 3011987” painted on nose (previously “USA 30127517” painted on hull sides and nose).
Name: “Old Harry” previously painted on glacis.
Other Identification: Allied stars painted on turret sides and glacis. Preparation notes painted on forward right track guard (“PREPARED BY L.T.D …ANTI-FREEZE INSTALLED”). “HAIL-AA-ORD11-SO-5H300L051” painted on rear right track guard. “b0901” cast into left of mantlet. “1142 14” stamped into right of mantlet.

Britain took delivery of a few Pershings at the end of the war, of which this is one, but never used them in action. It was put on the museum books in 1949.


64) M46 Patton Tank American


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1934

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Unique ID: 1934
Serial Number: “559” or similar stamped into front towing lugs.
Registration: “30163515” was at one time painted on the tank (source: Tank Museum Record).
Name:
Other Identification: “B1065” cast into left of mantlet. “73 ∆” and “C 22” painted on upper glacis. Allied stars painted on turret sides. Tiger face emblem painted on glacis.

This M46 was supplied to Great Britain for evaluation, and is believed to have been tested at FVRDE in 1951, as tank test 4094 (source: Museum Vehicle Record). It was put on the museum books in 1962, and now has a tiger face painted on the glacis plate, as seen on examples that served in the Korean War.


65) SU-76M Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1936

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Unique ID: 1936
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall with a camouflage scheme of white swathes on green (previously overall green).

This is a later model SU-76. It was used by Communist forces during the Korean War where it was captured by the Allies in 1950. It is displayed with its front hatch open to show the driver’s position and twin GAZ six-cylinder petrol engines arranged in line on the right-hand side of the tank. Its rear door is also open allowing the fighting compartment and gun to be seen.


66) KV-1 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1937

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Unique ID: 1937
Serial Number: 11306: “11306” engraved into the glacis.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “716” and a patriotic slogan painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a whitewash (previously overall green).

This is a Model 1941 KV-1 with cast turret. It was built in the ‘Tankograd’ factory at Chelyabinsk. Two KV-1 tanks, which according to contemporary sources had a lot of extra care lavished on them, were supplied by the USSR in 1943 as samples to the West, one to Britain, one to the USA. This exhibit is the British sample and after evaluation at the British Army’s School of Tank Technology it was donated to the Tank Museum. It was put on the museum books in 1952. It has been painted to represent a Red Army tank, whitewashed for winter conditions and bearing the patriotic slogan ‘From the women of Leningrad to the Front’.


67) Praying Mantis Carrier British


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1956

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Unique ID: 1956
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Praying Mantis was designed by Mr E J Tapp of County Commercial Cars and the original patent dates from 1937. Two prototypes were built of which this is the second. The idea was to create a low profile weapon carrier which could take advantage of natural cover but raise itself up, as necessary, to shoot over walls or other obstacles. (Source: Tank Museum Record). Tank museum photographs show it being evaluated at the School of Tank Technology, Chertsey.


68) T-26 Light Tank British / Soviet


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1935

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Unique ID: 1935
Serial Number:
Registration: Ps165-8 (Finnish, source: Tank Museum Record).
Name:
Other Identification: Painted with Finnish markings: “84” painted on nose, swastika painted on turret sides, and skull and crossbones painted on superstructure front.

This T-26 was used by Soviet forces in the war against Finland in the winter of 1940/41. It was captured and used by the Finnish Army, in whose markings it is now shown. Later the engine was removed and the tank buried, up to its turret, as part of the fixed defences of the Mannerheim Line, built across the Karelian Isthmus near the border with Russia. As part of the post-war reparations, Finnish Karelia was transferred from Finnish to Russian control.


69) Mark VII Tetrarch CS Airborne Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1938

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Unique ID: 1938
Serial Number:
Registration: T9274: “T9274” painted on hull sides.
Name: “RITZ” painted on forward turret sides.
Other Identification: “HQ” painted on rear turret sides. Unit markings painted on nose. Painted overall in a green and brown camouflage scheme (previously overall green).

Although originally a Vickers Armstrong design, production of Tetrarchs was transferred to Metropolitan-Cammell, contract T6423, dated 25th January 1939 to leave Vickers to concentrate on other war work. Vickers Armstrongs is just visible on the plaque but has been erased. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).
This Tetrarch was one of the few converted to the close support (CS) role, with a 3in howitzer substituted for the usual 2pdr. It was put on the museum books in 1949. It was restored in 1984-85, along with the Vickers Medium Tank and the Praying Mantis Carrier, by Vickers Defence Systems at their Armstrong Works, Scotswood Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. It is currently displayed inside part of a Hamilcar glider. It is believed to be in running order.


70) Mark VIII Harry Hopkins Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1939

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Unique ID: 1939
Serial Number:
Registration: T119224: “T119224” painted on forward hull sides, and found under paintwork when restored in 2007. T119223 previously painted on hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: “METRO CAM 17-6-42” found under paintwork.

Some 940 of these Harry Hopkins tanks were ordered from Metropolitan-Cammell and Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon Company but only 100 were produced, all by Metro-Cammell. Its label states “This example was once seen at a Royal Armoured Corps display in the sixties dressed up to look like a ship, complete with masts and paddles, and at another time took part, without its turret, in soft ground-crossing trials that resulted in the development of the Scorpion”. The trials took place at Lulworth.
This tank underwent restoration in the Tank Museum workshops during 2007. Its original registration was uncovered, as well as a marking referring to its manufacture: “METRO CAM 17-6-42”.


71) A9 Cruiser Mark I Tank British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1940

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Unique ID: 1940
Serial Number: “2047/44” (unconfirmed).
Registration: T7230: “T7230” painted on hull sides (previously on turret sides). “PMV 586” previously painted on nose.
Name: “EAGER” previously painted on left side stowage box.
Other Identification: “0042” painted on right of glacis. Unit markings painted on nose. Yellow triangle markings painted on front, rear and sides of turret. Painted overall in a green and black camouflage scheme.

This A9 was built in February 1940 and put on the museum books in 1949. It is painted in the markings of the 3rd Royal Tank Regiment, 1st Armoured Division, British Expeditionary Force, France, June 1940.


72) A10 Cruiser Mark IIA CS Tank British


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1941

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Unique ID: 1941
Serial Number:
Registration: “T9261” previously painted on hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green and black camouflage scheme (previously overall green with unit markings on nose and turret sides).

This A10 was one of the thirty built as the Mark IIA CS with a 3.7in howitzer substituted for the usual 2pdr gun. It was put on the museum books in 1949.


73) A13 Covenanter Tank British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1942

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Unique ID: 1942
Serial Number:
Registration: T23140: “T23140” painted on rear turret stowage box.
Name: “ACHILLES” painted on nose stowage box.
Other Identification: Triangle markings painted on turret sides. Red/white/red stripes painted on nose and hull side stowage boxes. Unit markings painted on nose.

The label for this Mark III Covenanter states “Our exhibit is shown in its original markings, when it served with A Squadron, 13th/18th Hussars in 9th Armoured Division. For some reason it was buried, after the war, on a farm near Dorking”. It was recovered by the Royal Engineers before being restored and it now has a plaque on its nose that reads as follows:

THIS TANK
WAS GIVEN TO THE MUSEUM
BY THE LORD ASHCOMBE
AFTER BEING DISCOVERED
ON HIS SURREY ESTATE IN 1983
WHERE IT HAD LAIN BURIED FOR MANY YEARS
IT WAS RESTORED TO EXHIBITION CONDITION
BY THE STAFF OF 18 BASE WORKSHOP REME
AT BOVINGTON THE WORK WAS COMPLETED IN JULY 1985


74) A15 Crusader Tank British


Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1943

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Unique ID: 1943
Serial Number:
Registration: T126272: “T126272” painted on side stowage boxes.
Name:
Other Identification: Red triangle markings painted on turret sides. Unit markings painted on nose and hull rear. Painted overall in a black and sand camouflage scheme.

This Crusader is a Mark III. It is displayed towing a trailer. It is in running order and took part in Tankfest 2006.


75) Centaur Dozer British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1944

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Unique ID: 1944
Serial Number:
Registration: 54 ZR 78, converted from T186642 (source: Tank Museum Record). “T.185389” painted on nose and hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “819” painted on blue square on hull front. Unit markings painted on hull front.

This Centaur Dozer was converted from a Mark IV tank, one of 80 Centaurs fitted with the 95mm Close Support Howitzer. It served with the British Army until 7th August 1963 and was sold to Pounds Shipowners and Shipbreakers Ltd at The Old Chemical Works, Portsmouth, in January 1968. It was acquired from there and restored for the museum; another one went to the private Budge Collection at the same time. It was put on the museum books in 1985. It is displayed in the markings of the 79th Armoured Division, Northwest Europe, 1944/45.


76) A34 Comet Tank British


Number of Photos:
18
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1945

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Unique ID: 1945
Serial Number:
Registration: Unknown. “09 ZR 88” painted on nose and hull rear. No registration plates inside; number painted on vehicle is incorrect (source: Tank Museum Record).
Name: “ADAMANT” painted on side stowage boxes.
Other Identification: Royal Tank Regiment emblems painted on turret sides. Unit markings painted on nose and front mud flaps. “8033055” or similar cast into right of mantlet. Painted overall dark green with some components highlighted in white.

This Comet I is a Type B. It has been painted like a vehicle on parade.


77) A41 Centurion Tank British


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1946

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Unique ID: 1946
Serial Number: 9: “P9” painted on turret sides (indicating ninth pilot vehicle).
Registration: T352416: “T352416” painted on turret sides. Later 03 ZR 70: “03 ZR 70” previously painted on front left mud flap.
Name:
Other Identification: Guards soldier emblem painted on turret stowage box.

The first six pilot models of the Centurion Tank were delivered in May 1945. They were rushed to Germany for testing in combat conditions with 22nd Armoured Brigade, part of Guards Armoured Division. However, the war had ended by the time they arrived. This exercise was known as ‘Operation Sentry’, and this Centurion is painted to resemble one of these tanks. It was actually the ninth of the twenty pilot models built of the Mark I. It therefore has a rear turret escape hatch, and a 20mm Polsten cannon as secondary armament. It was put on the museum books in 1951.


78) A11 Matilda I Tank British


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1947

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Unique ID: 1947
Serial Number: “2635”.
Registration: PMX 466: “PMX 466” painted on nose. Previously T8106: “T8106” painted on hull sides.
Name: “DEMON” painted on glacis plate.
Other Identification: ‘Chinese Eye’ marking painted on right turret side. Unit markings painted on nose. Overall painted in a black and brown camouflage scheme.

This Matilda I was built in March 1940 and put on the museum books in 1949. It was restored to running condition in the 1980s and is displayed in the markings of the 4th Royal Tank Regiment (4RTR), May 1940.


79) A11 Matilda I Tank British


Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2088

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Unique ID: 2088
Serial Number:
Registration: HMH 802: “HMH 802” painted on nose and on plate on hull rear. T3447: “T3447” painted on right hull side.
Name:
Other Identification: ‘Chinese eye’ emblem painted on right turret side. Painted overall in a light and dark green camouflage scheme.

Recovered from Otterburn Ranges by Tracked Armour Group and 156 Transport Regiment RCT (was at grid reference 898 969 with turret at GR 902 964). Restoration revealed registration ‘HMH 802’ (possibly ‘T3447’), and the possible traces of an ‘H’ Battalion name. This tank was probably also used by 4th RTC. Engine and gearbox are not authentic. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).
This A11 was put on the museum books in 1993. It is in running order and has taken part in displays, including Tankfest 2006.


80) A12 Matilda CDL Searchlight Vehicle British


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1948

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Unique ID: 1948
Serial Number: 199201: “199201” stamped into data plate.
Registration: T7341: “T7341” stamped into data plate and painted on forward hull sides. “PMV 697” painted on registration plate attached to rear right track guard.
Name: “DOVER” and the coat of arms of the town and port of Dover painted on hull sides.
Other Identification: White circle painted on turret sides.

The CDL (Canal Defence Light) was an armoured housing containing a powerful searchlight, substituted for a tank's normal turret. The idea had been advocated, for illuminating the battlefield during night actions, by private individuals but had been sold to the War Office in 1937. 300 improved turrets were ordered for fitting to Matildas in 1940, but these never saw action. Training in Britain was carried out at Lowther Castle near Penrith, and it is presumed that this vehicle served there.
This Matilda has a data plate attached to the nose that reads as follows:

TANK, INFANTRY, MARK V
MAKERS NO 199201 W.D. NO T.7341
DATE JUNE : 1941 1/12/A

A mock-up of the right hand side of a Matilda CDL turret sits on the engine deck and shows the internal arrangement of light and mirrors.


81) Valentine Tank British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1949

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Unique ID: 1949
Serial Number: 2924: “2924” stamped into data plate.
Registration: T16065: “T16065” stamped into data plate (and previously painted on nose).
Name: “MANCHESTER” painted on hull front.
Other Identification: “9” in red circle painted on turret sides. Unit markings painted on nose. Painted overall sand (previously overall green).

This Valentine is fitted with an AEC diesel engine, making it a Mark II. It was built in October 1940 so it was one of the first; it is therefore presumed to have been most likely built by Vickers. It was put on the museum books in 1949. In the past it was displayed fitted with a coin-operated turret traverse system. It has a data plate attached to the left track guard that reads:

INFANTRY TANK MARK III.
VICKERS-ARMSTRONGS DESIGN
2924 W.D. NO T16065
DATE OCT – 1940

A Valentine 2pdr gunnery training stand is displayed nearby.


82) Valentine Tank British


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2042

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Unique ID: 2042
Serial Number:
Registration: T67003: “T67003” painted on forward turret sides. “T123358” previously painted on left turret side.
Name:
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on nose. Painted overall sand and brown (previously painted overall sand).

The precise identity of this Valentine Mark IX is not clear, all identification marks having been removed many years ago. It stood outside the Army Base at Long Kesh (later known as the Maze Prison) in Northern Ireland for many years, subsequently moving to Lisanelly Camp, Omagh. It was acquired by Vickers Defence Systems and restored to running order in Newcastle using the engine from the Museum’s Valentine Archer. In due course it was offered to the Museum on loan and ultimately, in March 2002, was gifted to the Museum. It carries the number “T123358” on the turret which is correct for the type but not necessarily for this actual vehicle. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).
This Valentine is in running order and has taken part in various events including the Tanks in Action display in August 2000, and Tankfests 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2008. In about 2010/11 it appeared briefly in new markings, then was repainted in a sand and brown camouflage scheme and with a new registration number painted on the turret.


83) Valentine Bridgelayer British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1950

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Unique ID: 1950
Serial Number: 728: “O.P. 728” stamped into data plate.
Registration: T16278: “T16278” stamped into data plate and painted on hull rear.
Name: “HANNIBAL” painted on hull sides.
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on nose and hull rear.

This Bridgelayer is based on a Valentine Mark I; being one of the first Valentines it is presumed to have been most likely built by Vickers. It was converted to a bridgelayer by the Southern Railway’s workshops at Eastleigh, Hampshire, in 1944 (source: Museum Vehicle Record). It was put on the museum books in 1949. It has a data plate attached to the left track guard that reads:

INFANTRY TANK MARK III.
VICKERS-ARMSTRONGS DESIGN
O. P. 728 W.D. NO T-16278
DATE ??? – 1941


84) Archer Tank Destroyer British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1951

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Unique ID: 1951
Serial Number:
Registration: 83 ZS 80. “S280017” painted on nose and left rear superstructure.
Name:
Other Identification: Unit markings painted on front mud flaps and track guards.

This Mark I Archer is painted in the markings of a self-propelled anti-tank regiment of the Canadian Army in Italy in 1944. It was received from the Royal Military College of Science at Shrivenham in March 1969 and was on display in the museum car park for some years.


85) A22 Churchill AVRE Tank British


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1952

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Unique ID: 1952
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: 79th Armoured Division markings on hull front and rear.

This tank had been used as a marker on a firing range for many years. It was restored to running order, from a total wreck, by Mr Bob Grundy of Wigan and his Tracked Armour Group (now British Military Vehicles) in August 1988. It took part in Tankfest 2000.


86) A38 Valiant Tank British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1953

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Unique ID: 1953
Serial Number: Pilot model.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Plaque fitted on glacis. “MOS No 294/8/R/7641.” painted on nose.

Vickers suggested a design in late 1943 for an improved version of the Valentine tank with a larger three-man turret and many other changes. Ruston and Hornsby completed this pilot model in 1944, made from mild steel (the plaque reads: “CAUTION UNARMOURED”). It was designated A38. Following unsuccessful trials the project was terminated in 1945. The pilot model was put on the museum books in 1952. It was on display in the museum car park for some years.


87) A43 Black Prince Tank British


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1954

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Unique ID: 1954
Serial Number: 4: “No 4” painted on hull front (indicating fourth pilot vehicle).
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “D&M AFV SCHOOLS” markings on front right mud flap and hull rear.

By 1943 it had become clear to the British Army that tanks with 17pdr guns were urgently needed for the forthcoming invasion of Europe. Vauxhall were therefore asked to produce such a version of the Churchill Tank as an interim solution. Designated A43, it was initially known as Super Churchill but was later officially named Black Prince. Six prototypes were ordered and these were delivered for trials in May 1945, too late for hostilities. Production was cancelled as the much superior Centurion Tank was ready at the same time. This Black Prince was the fourth pilot model; from its D&M school markings it is presumed to have previously been at the Bovington Driving and Maintenance School. It was put on the museum books in 1949.


88) Type 95 Ha-Go Light Tank Japanese


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 26

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Unique ID: 26
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “663” and white star painted on hull rear. Tactical marking of three white vertical bars painted on turret rear. Japanese flag painted on nose. Painted overall in a green, brown and yellow camouflage scheme.

This Type 95 was captured in Malaya and was examined in Calcutta before being sent to Britain. It was put on the museum books in 1951. Its markings indicate a tank of 14th Sensha Rentai (Tank Regiment) in 3rd Sensha Shidan (Tank Division) around 1941.


89) L3/33lf Flame-Throwing Tankette Italian


Number of Photos:
18
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 861

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Unique ID: 861
Serial Number:
Registration: 1840: “ROETO 1840” painted on rear hull. “ROETO 89 r” painted on rear of trailer.
Name:
Other Identification: “1065” or similar painted on glacis but partially painted over. “2” and three white stripes on red rectangle painted on superstructure sides and rear hull. “M O S” painted on rear hull and rear of trailer. Painted overall in sand and brown camouflage scheme.


90) Carro Armato M14/41 Tank Italian


Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1698

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Unique ID: 1698
Serial Number: 1903: chassis
1251: hull (engine 100753, gun 38320).
Registration: 4867: museum records.
Name:
Other Identification: “ROETO 3543” painted on nose and rear hull. “1” and three white stripes on blue rectangle painted on turret sides and rear.Painted overall in a sand and brown camouflage scheme.


91) SOMUA S-35 Tank French


Number of Photos:
17
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1955

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Unique ID: 1955
Serial Number: 57: “KO S No 57E” cast into front left and rear right superstructure.
Registration: 67227: “67227”painted on nose and hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “538Φ604” or similar cast into hatch on right side of engine compartment. “29” painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a sand, green and brown camouflage scheme.

This S-35 tank had been captured during the war and employed by the Germans who carried out various small modifications (German aerial base, and commander’s cupola cut off in the style adopted by Germans on captured French equipment). It was presented to the museum by France in June 1957 (source: D. Goulty). It was put on the museum books in 1962. It is shown in the markings of the 4th Cuirassiers of 1st DLM which adopted the Joan of Arc badge. It is displayed with its side hatch removed so the interior can be seen.


92) AC1 Sentinel Tank Australian


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1957

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Unique ID: 1957
Serial Number: 49: “8049” painted on hull sides and rear.
Registration: T41525.
Name:
Other Identification: “BK AH84” cast into transmission cover. “53” cast into left side of mantlet. Painted overall in a green and sand camouflage scheme.

This Sentinel was one of the 68 Australian Cruisers built, none of which saw action. It was put on the museum books in 1949.


93) Ram Target Tank Canadian / Dutch


Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1958

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Unique ID: 1958
Serial Number: 1174 (source: Museum Vehicle Record).
Registration: 159418 (source: Museum Vehicle Record). “CT-159602” painted on forward hull sides.
Name:
Other Identification: “882” or similar stamped into centre transmission cover. “B3” painted on turret sides. “E1231 A608 Lo [G]” or similar cast into left transmission cover. “E1232 OSF 1416” cast into centre transmission cover. “232” and “E4751” cast into right transmission cover. Canadian flag painted on hull sides and centre transmission cover.

This Ram Mark II was one of a small batch acquired by the Dutch Army in 1946. It was rearmed with the QF 75mm Mark 5 gun. It was later used as a mobile target for light weapons, which is why every possible opening has been sealed or welded over. The tank was originally acquired in the Netherlands by the Sherwood Rangers Association for display in Nijmegen, and 17th/21st Lancers had undertaken to restore it for display on a plinth. It had previously been on display as a gate guardian at the Dutch Army tank workshop at Leusden (source: ShermanTank.nl). A Sherman, however, was felt to be more suitable, so the Tank Museum acquired a plinthed M4A1 of Royal Scots Dragoon Guards from the School of Infantry at Warminster and it was shipped to 17th/21st Lancers. The Ram was shipped to Marchwood from Antwerp on RFA Sir Lancelot. It was put on the museum books in 1988. It is characteristic of those produced between registration CT159402 and 159502. It has the auxiliary machine-gun turret, no side doors or ventilation louvres in the hull sides and the turret pistol ports have been replaced with circular plates. It has Sherman-type T54E1 track links and Sherman suspension with trailing return rollers. The aerial mounts are in depressions on the turret roof, not mounted on brackets as in earlier tanks. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).


94) Ram Kangaroo Armoured Personnel Carrier Canadian


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1959

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Unique ID: 1959
Serial Number:
Registration: CT160141: “CT160141” painted on rear hull.
Name:
Other Identification: “306” and “5” stamped into centre transmission cover. “Lo [G]E1232 A1970” cast into centre transmission cover. White stars painted on hull sides. Unit markings painted on front track guards, rear hull and centre transmission cover. Fitted with Sherman steel chevron track. Painted overall sand.

The Ram Kangaroo consists of a Ram Tank modified for personnel carrying by the removal of the turret. This is a late production Mark I with a machine-gun turret and M3 style suspension but without side doors. It was recovered from Imber firing ranges by 4th Royal Tank Regiment and restored at 27 District Workshop REME at Warminster. It was fitted with Sherman tracks during restoration. It is displayed in the markings of the 1st Canadian Armoured Carrier Regiment which formed part of the British 79th Armoured Division. It has a plaque on the front left track guard that reads:

RAM KANGAROO APC
RECOVERED FROM SALISBURY PLAIN BY 4 RTR
REFURBISHED AS A STUDENT ENGINEER PROJECT BY
Mr S SMITH
UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF Mr D SAMSON
AT 27 DISTRICT WORKSHOP REME
OCTOBER – DECEMBER 1985

Cold War - Tamiya Hall



Location ID:
3012
Latitude, Longitude:50.69540424, -2.24398702
Location Accuracy:7



95) M41A1 Walker Bulldog Light Tank American


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1961

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Unique ID: 1961
Serial Number:
Registration: 30544 (New Zealand): “NZ 30544” painted on lower glacis plate.
Name:
Other Identification: “24” and “131” stamped into glacis plate. Kiwi emblem painted on lower glacis plate and rear hull. Prancing horse emblem painted on turret sides.

The New Zealand Royal Armoured Corps received ten M41A1s from the US Army in 1960. These remained in service with the 2nd Armoured Regiment until 1982, when they were replaced by twenty-six Scorpions. This M41 was a gift of the New Zealand Government and is shown with New Zealand Army markings. It was transported from Auckland to Felixstowe in September 1988 on the MV Vodice. It has a recorded mileage of 4026 miles. The maker’s plate in the driver’s compartment has been removed, but features of this vehicle indicate that it was built after vehicle 1803. It has a B47 Wireless Set, dated 1960, serial NZ 101, complete with headsets. Periscopes are complete, except for part of the commander’s one. This tank has the elevation and traverse controls characteristic of the M41A1. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).


96) M60A1 Tank American


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2086

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Unique ID: 2086
Serial Number: 8971.
Registration: JJO 1Z8.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted in a green, brown, sand and black MERDC camouflage scheme.

This M60A1 (RISE) came from US Army stocks in Germany and is finished in a typical camouflage scheme. It was put on the museum books in 1993. It is in running order and has taken part in a number of events, including Tankfest 2004, 2009 and 2010.


97) M103A2 Heavy Tank American


Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2045

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Unique ID: 2045
Serial Number:
Registration: USMC registration painted on side stowage boxes.
Name:
Other Identification: “A12” painted on right turret side. Red diamond painted on glacis.

This M103 took part in the Battle Day on 26 July 1997. It was on display in the Tamiya Hall for some years and has returned there from storage or the workshops.


98) T-55 Trainer Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1963

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Unique ID: 1963
Serial Number: “(K73) 47BN2030G 84 162” stamped into lower glacis plate.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Sections cut away on left, right and rear of turret, and forward left side of hull.

This T55A was specially prepared by the former East German Army as a turret crew training vehicle, in particular for training the commander. It has a label that reads “Wartungs- und Instandsetzungstrainer U-WIT 155 A Hersteller: PzWGL-15 1990”. It was put on the museum books in 1994.


99) FV4201 Chieftain Tank British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1964

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Unique ID: 1964
Serial Number:
Registration: 11 FD 58: “11 FD 58” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: “4/7RDG A0113A” painted on forward side skirts. A faint marking “SALE 6033” is visible on the front left mud flap. Painted overall in a green and black camouflage scheme.

This Mark 11C served with the 10th Hussars, the 4th Royal Tank Regiment, the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards, the Royal Hussars and the 2nd Armoured Delivery Squadron, all in BAOR, before being acquired by the museum. It currently has 4/7 RDG markings.


100) FV4211 Experimental Chieftain Tank British


Number of Photos:
5
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1965

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Unique ID: 1965
Serial Number:
Registration: 04 SP 28: “04 SP 28” painted on front left mud flap.
Name:
Other Identification: “8537” painted on front right mud flap.

This is an FV4211, an experimental version of the Chieftain. It was manufactured in 1969 with Chobham armour, and was the first main battle tank in the world with an aluminium hull. It used Chieftain automotive components but clearly resembles the shape of the later Challenger tank. This example is believed to be TV-A, the first of nine Test Vehicles scheduled for production following the trials of two prototypes MTR-1 and MTR-2. It was put on the museum books in 1990.


101) FV4030/2 Khalid Tank British / Jordanian


Number of Photos:
5
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2136

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Unique ID: 2136
Serial Number:
Registration: 05 SP 50: “05 SP 50” previously painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a sand, brown and black geometric scheme (previously in a sand, green and brown camouflage scheme, before that overall green).

This Khalid was put on the museum books in 2005. A museum photograph shows that it was previously at FVRDE. It was repainted for the first time in June 2006. It is in running order and has taken part in a number of events including Tankfests 2006, 2010 and 2011.
A Tankfest news item in April 2010 reported: “Jordan bought 274… Khalid MBT’s. However, this one was retained by Vickers to be used as a pattern tank, or type example, in case any further upgrades were to be purchased by the Jordanians. The paint work on the Khalid was looking very tired so the Workshop Team - under the leadership of Mike Hayton (the Workshop Manager) set to work on this project. The first step was to remove the exterior tin work - these bins were originally used to stow the CES (complete equipment schedule) kit - but over the years had become heavily rusted - Ian Burgess set about restoring these bins back to their former glory. The second step was to then needle gun the hull and turret- a process that takes the tank back down to bare metal ready to receive a fresh coat of primer. In the meantime the tracks were broken and removed from the Khalid to be “track bashed” a process were by [sic] the track pads are removed and replaced with new ones - anyone that has ever had the misfortune of undertaking this task will know this is an incredibly slow, boring and physically exhausting process. Currently Khalid has been stripped of paint and is awaiting its new Digital camouflage colour scheme. The Jordanian Defence forces used a ‘digital’ camouflage scheme that is based on a map of Jordan.”. This repaint was completed in May 2010.


102) TOG 2* Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1966

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Unique ID: 1966
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green, black and yellow camouflage scheme.

The TOG was a tank designed in 1939 by a committee (‘The Old Gang’) whose members had been involved in tank design during the First World War. Two prototypes were produced by Fosters of Lincoln: TOG 1 with all-round tracks and a Matilda Tank turret, and TOG 2 with recessed tracks and a 6pdr gun in a mock up turret. In 1942 this second vehicle, TOG 2, was refitted with a 17pdr turret similar to those used on the contemporary Challenger Tank and was redesignated TOG 2*. The type was not developed further and this prototype was put on the museum books in 1951; it was displayed outside for many years. It is currently displayed with its left side door open so that the interior can be seen. It has a plaque fixed on its glacis.


103) FV214 Conqueror Heavy Tank British


Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1967

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Unique ID: 1967
Serial Number:
Registration: 40 BA 86: “40 BA 86” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: RAC Centre markings painted on front mud flaps.

This Conqueror is a Mark 1; it is fitted with a rear turret stowage rack. From its RAC Centre markings it is presumed to have previously been an instructional or display vehicle elsewhere at Bovington Camp. It was put on the museum books in 1965.


104) AMX-30B2 Tank French


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1969

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Unique ID: 1969
Serial Number:
Registration: 2840127: “2840 127” painted on nose and hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green, brown and black camouflage scheme.

This AMX-30 was put on the museum books in 1994. It took part in Tankfest 2011.


105) Panzer 61 Tank Swiss


Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2129

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Unique ID: 2129
Serial Number: 971 6545640.
Registration: 77640: “77640” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification:

This Panzer 61 was put on the museum books in 1995. It is in running order and took part in Tankfest 2006. It was on display in the Tamiya Hall for some time and has returned there from storage or the workshops.

Post War (British Steel Hall)



Location ID:
3014
Latitude, Longitude:50.69493021, -2.24363833
Location Accuracy:7



106) Leopard C2 Tank German


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1981

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Unique ID: 1981
Serial Number: 18054: chassis
0076B: turret
Registration: 78-85095: “78-85095” painted on left hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “23C” painted on turret and hull rear. “CARC” painted on hull rear. Black maple leaf painted on rangefinder blanking plates. Painted overall green.

It has been reported that two Leopards were donated by the Canadian Army (source: Flickr).This is an ex-Canadian Leopard C2, a Leopard 1A3 chassis mounting a Leopard 1A5 turret. It arrived at the museum in about 2006 and took part in Tankfest 2006. It is in full running order and was one of three Leopards that took part in Tankfest 2009. It was put on display in the British Steel Hall in about November 2011 (source: Museum Vehicle Record).


107) SU-100 Tank Destroyer Soviet / Czech


Number of Photos:
11
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1970

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Unique ID: 1970
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “٣” (3) painted on superstructure front. White crescent on black circle markings on superstructure front and sides. Painted overall sand.

This SU-100 is of Czechoslovak manufacture. It was captured at Port Said from the Egyptian Army by 3 Para, part of the British Parachute Brigade. This was during Operation Musketeer, the Anglo-French landings in Egypt in November 1956, part of the Suez Campaign. The Egyptian SU-100s which fought at Suez were detached from the 1st Armoured Brigade Team which had been fighting the Israelis at Abu Aweigila in the Sinai. It was shipped to the United Kingdom for evaluation on 8 November 1956. Once in Britain it proved of considerable interest to military intelligence since the gun was the same as that mounted in the contemporary Russian main battle tank, the T-54. It was delivered to the Museum on 25 January 1958. It is displayed in Egyptian markings. The driver’s hatch is open so the interior can be seen. It is in running order and took part in Tankfest 2006.


108) T-54A(M) Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1971

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Unique ID: 1971
Serial Number: “540?...?” stamped into glacis. “540 09” (source: Museum Vehicle Record).
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: A grid of markings is stamped into the glacis.

This T-54 was captured by the Israeli Army from the Syrian Army and sent to Britain for evaluation. It was restored by 18 Command Workshops between September 1976 and May 1977. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).
This T-54 Model 1951 appears to be in poor condition. It is presumed to have been captured during the 1973 Yom Kippur War when Syria invaded the Golan Heights.


109) Sabre CVR(T) Light Tank British


Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1974

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Unique ID: 1974
Serial Number:
Registration: 03 FD 70: “03 FD 70” painted on nose and rear hull.
Name:
Other Identification: Painted overall in a green and black camouflage scheme.

This Sabre was put on the museum books in 2003.


110) FV102 Striker CVR(T) Anti-Tank Guided Missile Carrier British


Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1975

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Unique ID: 1975
Serial Number:
Registration: 03 SP 42 (source: Tank Museum Record). “07 FF 56” painted on nose.
Name: “SIDI REZEGH” painted on superstructure sides.
Other Identification: Royal Horse Artillery emblem and battle honours painted on hull sides. Emblems including “RSA” painted on front mud flaps.

This Striker was one of the prototypes of the series and was put on the museum books in 1991. It is painted in the markings of L Battery, Royal Horse Artillery.


111) FV4101 Charioteer Tank Destroyer British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1794

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Unique ID: 1794
Serial Number:
Registration: “04 ZW 12”. “7611 ٧٦١١” painted on nose and rear hull.
Name: “BAB AL WAD” painted on left turret side. Equivalent Arabic script painted on right turret side.
Other Identification: Black squares painted on forward turret sides and turret rear. Unit markings painted on nose and rear hull. Painted overall desert sand (previously overall green).

The Charioteer was a post-war conversion of existing Cromwell Tank chassis with a new turret mounting a 20pdr gun. This Mark VII Charioteer was received from the Royal Military College of Science at Shrivenham in March 1969. It has been painted to represent a tank of the Jordanian Royal Armoured Corps, the Arab Legion.


112) FV4401 Contentious Tank Destroyer British


Number of Photos:
5
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 2010

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Unique ID: 2010
Serial Number:
Registration: UXM 127: “UXM 127” painted on plate on nose.
Name:
Other Identification:

Contentious was part of Project Prodigal, a wide ranging British investigation into future fighting vehicles. The object was to produce a highly mobile, air-portable AFV capable of dealing with all types of enemy tank. The original plan was to mount a 20 pounder gun with limited traverse and linked to an auto-loader which would depend, for elevation and depression, on adjustment of the tank’s suspension. This would ensure a low profile vehicle, capable of being operated by a two-man crew. The prototype, based on a modified Comet chassis, was used to test some of the principles but the scheme got no further. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).
This Contentious was originally recovered from a firing range. Museum photos show it at Kirkcudbright in October 1964. It was also tested at Lulworth (source: Wikipedia). It was far from complete and has been fitted with a new gun. It was a prototype for an experimental self-propelled gun with variable-geometry suspension. It has a fixed-elevation and limited-traverse 105mm gun, and an automatic loader. It was acquired by the museum from the Royal Military College of Science at Shrivenham, in October 1976, and was originally displayed shrouded in camouflage netting, probably for security reasons.


113) A41 Centurion Tank British


Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1976

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Unique ID: 1976
Serial Number:
Registration: 02 ZR 18: “02 ZR 18” painted on hull rear. T351992 (source: Tank Museum Record).
Name:
Other Identification: Displayed cut into two halves.

This Centurion was built as a Mark 2 at the Royal Ordnance Factory, Leeds, and was originally fitted with the 17pdr tank gun. It was converted to a Mark 3 and eventually ended service as a Mark 5. It was acquired in a poor state from a storage dump at the Vehicle Depot, Ludgershall, Wiltshire. It is displayed in two sections after being cut in half at the ROF, Leeds, in a two-year project (from 1982 to 1984) by young apprentices and graduate trainees. This is to graphically demonstrate the conditions and equipment found inside a tank. The exhibit includes a video display, and has a plaque that reads:

OPENED BY
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN
Colonel-in-Chief Royal Tank Regiment
30th May 1997

In Commemoration of the
80th Anniversary of the Battle of Cambrai
and
In Celebration of
Her Majesty’s 50th Wedding Anniversary


114) Stridsvagn 104c Tank British / Swedish


Number of Photos:
5
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1994

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Unique ID: 1994
Serial Number:
Registration: 80342 (Swedish): “80342” painted on nose and hull rear. Previously 05 BA 71 (British).
Name:
Other Identification: Reactive armour on hull front and turret. Painted overall in a dark green, light green, brown and black camouflage scheme.

This was one of the first six Centurion tanks sold to Sweden in 1953. It was a Mark 3, designated Stridsvagn 81 in the Swedish Army. By 1978 it had been upgraded with the addition of a 105mm gun and was now known as Stridsvagn 102. In 1981 the Bofors company was given the task of improving the Swedish Army’s Centurions with new fire-control equipment and a year later some tanks were further improved with a General Dynamics diesel engine and Allison automatic transmission and in 1985 by the fitting of a modern Hydrostrut suspension system. In this form it was now the Stridsvagn 104. The final modification, in 1994, was the fitting of add-on reactive armour to the hull front and turret. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record). It is in running order.


115) FV4018 Centurion Beach Armoured Recovery Vehicle British


Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 1977

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Unique ID: 1977
Serial Number:
Registration: 00 ZR 21: “00 ZR 21” painted on driver’s compartment and hull rear.
Name: “GOLD BEACH POOL” painted on lifebuoy on left side.
Other Identification: “K 12.12.01 R” chalked on front right track guard.

The Centurion BARV was developed at the Royal Marines Amphibious Trials and Training Unit (ATTURM) at Instow in Devon in the late 1950s and twelve were built, by converting old Centurion gun tanks, by the Royal Ordnance Factory in Leeds. This BARV served at various times on the two Royal Navy Assault Ships, HMS Fearless and HMS Intrepid. It is recorded as being on HMS Fearless in the Falklands in 1982 (source: MAFVA.net). It is in running order and took part in Tankfests 2004 and 2011.