Preserved Tanks .com
    World Register of Surviving Historic Armoured Vehicles

Current Query: Full entry for the tank(s)/location: by Type and Update, Location & Update with Spare Photos, NavPix & Videos

Panther Tank



Powered By Subgurim(http://googlemaps.subgurim.net).Google Maps ASP.NET

MAP CONTROLS: Use slider or mousewheel to zoom, and hold down left mouse button to drag.
KEY: Location markers are coloured from Green meaning exact to Red meaning gone or unknown (details here)

The Soviet T-34 tank had been encountered in July 1941 by units of the 18th Panzer Division but the tactical use of them had been very poor and German units were able to out-manoeuvre and defeat them. However in October of the same year the 4th Panzer Division advancing on Mzensk in the area of Army Group Centre was badly mauled by T-34s in massed formation. The vast superiority of the T-34 over the German tanks was made abundantly clear.
The 4th Panzer Division was part of 2nd Panzer Army commanded by General Guderian. He immediately wrote a report describing the marked superiority of the T-34 over the PzKpfw IV tank and urged that a Panzer Commission be sent immediately to his sector of the Front to look at the requirements for a new design of tank. This Commission reached Guderian’s Army on 20 November, and on 25 November Daimler-Benz and MAN were ordered to design a new 30 tonne tank capable of defeating the T-34.
On 23 January 1942 the Commission submitted detailed specifications for the new tank to Hitler and the two companies. In April the companies submitted their designs, for the vehicle known as VK3002, to the OKH Waffenprüfamt 6. The Daimler-Benz design strongly resembled the T-34 in layout and in the use of large roadwheels and rear sprocket drive. The MAN design was a more conventional German one, with torsion bar suspension, interleaved roadwheels and front sprocket drive. It did, however, incorporate two features of the T-34, namely the sloped armour and lack of return rollers.
Hitler intervened, suggested that the 7.5cm L/48 gun specified should be replaced by the more powerful L/60 under development, and ordered Daimler-Benz to commence production of 200 vehicles of their VK3002(DB) design. However, after Waffenprüfamt 6 had evaluated the two designs, it was decided that the MAN proposal was more suitable for production. The order was withdrawn from Daimler-Benz and placed with MAN.
The first pilot model of the VK3002(MAN) was completed in September 1942 and the vehicle had by this time become known as the Panzerkampfwagen V Panther. The proposed L/60 gun had not come up to specification so it was lengthened to 70 calibres, and the KwK 42 L/70 then armed all models of the Panther. Panthers were soon being produced by MAN, Daimler-Benz, MNH of Hanover, and Henschel, and by the end of the war 5,508 had been built.
The Panther was one of the most important tank designs ever, being well armed and armoured, and also with excellent mobility - once its initial reliability problems were ironed out. The French used captured Panthers after the war and in 1947 the 503rd Armour Regiment at Mourmelon was equipped with Panthers. Other Panthers and Jagdpanthers were based at Satory and Bourges. The French Saumur Armour Museum now has the largest single collection of Panthers. A number were also completed at the end of the war by the British Army to be used for testing and evaluation, some of which also survive.
The first twenty pre-production models of the Panther were designated Ausf A. They followed the original specification in having 60mm thick frontal armour and the Maybach HL 210 engine. They had a characteristic ‘dustbin’ cupola, smoke dischargers on the turret sides, and a binocular gunner’s sight (visible as two apertures in the left side of the mantlet). There were two hinged flaps in the front glacis plate. The driver on the left had a vision port in front of him fitted with a laminated glass screen and protected with a large armoured hinged flap on the outside. He also had two fixed episcopes in the hull roof. The radio operator sat on the right and had a vertical ‘letterbox’ flap in the front plate through which he could fire his MG34. He also had a pair of episcopes in the hull roof. There was a small hatch in the left wall of the turret for ejecting spent shell cases, and also three pistol ports in the turret walls, one in each side and one in the rear.

Ausf D

The first full production model of the Panther was the Ausf D. A number of improvements had been suggested from trials with the pre-production models and these were incorporated in vehicles from January 1943. The glacis plate thickness was increased from 60mm to 80mm. This increased the overall weight of the vehicle so a more powerful Maybach HL 230 P30 engine was installed, along with an improved ZF AK 7-200 seven-speed syncromesh gearbox. The cupola was moved so that the bulge in the turret side could be eliminated, a double-baffle muzzle brake was fitted to the main armament, and solid six-spoke sprockets were fitted as standard.
Mid-production Ausf Ds showed a number of detail changes. The main change was the replacement of the smoke grenade dischargers on the turret sides by a Nahverteidigungswaffe installed in the turret roof. Also, some Ausf Ds could be seen fitted with a machine-gun rail, for anti-aircraft defence, around the top of the ‘dustbin’ cupola. From May 1943 5mm Schürzen armour plates were fitted to the hull sides, and Zimmerit anti-magnetic mine paste was applied to the hull and turret sides from September 1943 to September 1944.
Ausf Ds were originally fitted with roadwheels with sixteen bolts around their rim. These were found to fail with excessive use, and during production were replaced with ones drilled for twenty-four bolts. However, some vehicles were fitted with roadwheels with thirty-two rim bolts. This was a temporary solution, these roadwheels being made from sixteen-bolt roadwheels by drilling extra holes between the original ones. The different types of roadwheel were sometimes seen fitted to the same vehicle.
Late production Ausf Ds incorporated a number of improvements. They were fitted with a new cupola that had seven episcopes, and a machine-gun rail as standard. It offered better protection and visibility and was refitted to some earlier vehicles. The hatch in the left turret wall was removed, though the pistol ports were retained. Also, while earlier vehicles were fitted with a headlamp on each front mud flap, these vehicles had just one, on the left hand side.
The few Ausf As built had been classed with the Ausf D for record purposes by the Germans. Early in 1943 the early models of the Panther were redesignated to distinguish between them again. The original Ausf A became the Ausf D1, while the Ausf D proper became the Ausf D2. This system, at least, reduces confusion with the later Ausf A model.

Model Id:
235
Manufacture:Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nürnberg (MAN) AG, Nürnberg, Bavaria, Middle Franconia, Germany (Primary manufacturer)
Daimler-Benz AG, Marienfelde, Berlin, Germany (Additional manufacturer)
Maschinenfabrik Niedersachsen-Hannover (MNH) GmbH, Linden, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany (Additional manufacturer)
Henschel und Sohn, Kassel, Nordhessen, Germany (Minor manufacturer)


1) Wilhelminapark, Breda, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
2
Sample Photo from Album Number 31

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 31
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “534” painted on turret sides.

This is an early production Ausf D2, with the characteristic ‘dustbin’ cupola, and the loading hatch in the side of the turret. It is on display at the intersection of Wilhelminapark and Paul Windhausenweg in the town of Breda. It was originally captured by Free Polish troops. It was later presented as a memorial by the Polish forces that liberated the town in 1944. It was brought in from Meppen in Germany where the 1st Polish Armoured Division had its headquarters in 1945 (the Bundeswehr now has an Erprobungstelle testing ground at Meppen). Its suspension is damaged. It is now displayed with its engine area filled with concrete.

2) Panzermuseum, Thun, Switzerland

Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Album Number 32

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 32
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Number “334” painted on turret sides.

This Ausf D2 is fitted with an Ausf A turret. It also appears to be fitted with a fake mantlet.

Ausf A

The model that followed the Ausf D should logically have been the Ausf E, but was actually designated the Ausf A. The reason for this has never been explained but was probably due to an administrative or clerical error.
The Ausf A differed from the late production Ausf D mainly in having an armoured ball-mount for the machine-gun in the front glacis plate. This was for the radio operator, in place of the original armoured ‘vertical letterbox’ flap. Since the new mount incorporated a telescopic sight the forward facing operator’s periscope was no longer required and was deleted.
A number of other detail changes were made. The binocular sight for the gunner was replaced by a monocular one so there was now only one aperture in the left side of the mantlet. The pistol ports in the turret sides were deleted.
Early Ausf As had twin exhaust pipes leading out of the exhaust outlets on the hull back plate and had the wheel jack stored horizontally beneath them, in the same manner as the Ausf D. Later ones had the jack stored vertically between the exhaust outlets. This allowed quicker access to the starter dog clutch for manual starting of the engine. Later vehicles again had two extra, smaller, exhaust pipes leading out of the left hand exhaust outlet. This was an attempt to cure overheating problems with the engine installation. The outer two pipes drew in cold air over the exhaust pipe and kept the heat away from the oil cooler and petrol pumps.

Model Id:
240
Manufacture:Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nürnberg (MAN) AG, Nürnberg, Bavaria, Middle Franconia, Germany (Primary manufacturer)
Daimler-Benz AG, Marienfelde, Berlin, Germany (Additional manufacturer)
Maschinenfabrik Niedersachsen-Hannover (MNH) GmbH, Linden, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany (Additional manufacturer)
Deutsche Maschinenfabrik AG (Demag), Staaken, Berlin, Germany (Minor manufacturer)


3) War & Peace Collection, Ash, Britain

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 33

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 33
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Ausf A has been acquired by the Cadman brothers. It was acquired from France in an exchange for a British tank but the details are confidential. (Sources: R. Fleming, T. Royall, R. Stickland/Tank TV Magazine via J. Harris).
It was in a poor condition when received but is essentially complete. It has one hole from a small calibre shell penetration behind the roadwheels, indicating it may have spent some time on a firing range, and its suspension is damaged (source: R. Cadman). A workshop is being built around it so that it can be restored, and it will be displayed in the museum after this has been completed. It is currently without a gun and mantlet.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


The War and Peace Collection was previously known as the Tired Iron Collection.

4) Musée Memorial, Caen, France

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 34

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 34
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Panther is on display next to a Sherman Grizzly tank. [Preserved Tanks in France: Number 20].

5) 501-503 RCC, Mourmelon-le-Grand, France

Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Album Number 35

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 35
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Panther was captured on 13 September 1944 by the Leclerc Division (2nd French Armoured Division) at Dompaire, Vosges. It was presented, along with another Panther, to the Ville de Paris after the war. They remained on display at the Army Museum at Les Invalides until 1975. They were then rebuilt at the AMX workshops at Satory before being displayed at Saumur. [Preserved Tanks in France: Number 172].

6) Royal Tank Museum, Aqaba, Jordan

Number of Photos:
2
Sample Photo from Album Number 36

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 36
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “201” painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a German ‘ambush’ style green, sand and brown camouflage scheme.

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Ausf A is fitted with triple left exhaust pipes and carries the turret number “201”. It has a non-original aerial mount, and has an Ausf G fender headlamp mount (source: L. Archer). [Preserved Tanks in France: Number 72].

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This tank was previously part of the Saumur Tank Museum collection, and was missing its engine. It was exchanged in 2010 with an EBR armoured car for a Challenger 1 tank and a Saladin armoured car. It was transported via the air base at Evreux in December 2010. (Source: L’Express, Marianne2).

7) Museé Des Blindés, Saumur, France

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 37

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 37
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Panther was built by MNH in June 1944 and has the chassis number 155506. It is in running order and has taken part in Carrousel displays. It carries the turret number “211”. It was provided with a complete set of tools for carrying on the side of its hull by the German GEDORE society. This was after the CDEB (Saumur Documentation Centre) found a wrench in the bottom of one of its Panthers carrying the trademark of the society and returned it to them. It had not suffered any degradation since 1944. The E.R.G.M.E.B. at Gien helped with the restoration of a Panther engine to running order. Apparently some 14 Panther chassis were cannibalised to provide parts for restoring this one to operational condition. [Preserved Tanks in France: Number 173].

8) Museé Des Blindés, Saumur, France

Number of Photos:
2
Sample Photo from Album Number 38

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 38
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

At Saumur it was stored in the waste ground area with its hull machine-gun ball-mount and driver’s vision port plated over. [Preserved Tanks in France: Number 174].

9) Musée Août 1944, Falaise, France

Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Album Number 39

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 39
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Ausf A was recently acquired from the Saumur Museum in exchange for a SdKfz 251 Ausf D half-track (source: R. Fleming). It is little more than a rusted hulk. It is missing its turret, engine and large parts of its superstructure and suspension. It is believed that it was the one recovered by the Saumur Museum from a pond at Parroy, near Lunéville, in an operation involving military divers and several recovery vehicles. [Preserved Tanks in France: Number 175].

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


Additional photograph(s) available.

10) Auto und Technik Museum, Sinsheim, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 40

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 40
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This example was recently transferred from the BWB collection at Koblenz. It now carries the turret number “224”. It was originally acquired from Saumur Armour Museum, France, in about 1980.

11) Motor Technica Museum, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 41

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 41
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

(Source: R. Fleming).

12) U.S. Army Ordnance Museum, Aberdeen Proving Ground, USA

Number of Photos:
5
Sample Photo from Album Number 42

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 42
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This one was captured in Italy in 1944. Its right-hand suspension is damaged. Its original tactical number was “211” (source: L. Archer).

13) Canadian War Museum, LeBreton Flats, Canada

Number of Photos:
9
Sample Photo from Album Number 43

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 43
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Panther is on display in Worthington Park as part of the museum’s AFV collection.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This tank, after its capture, was shipped to Canada. It participated in V-E Day celebrations on Sparks Street in Ottawa on 8 May 1945. This means that it had been transported from Europe before the end of the war, but whether as a war trophy or for testing and experimentation by the military remains unknown. It was displayed at Canadian Forces Base Borden from the late 1940s until the Department of National Defence’s Directorate of History and Heritage, CFB Borden, and the Base Borden Military Museum donated it to the Canadian War Museum in February 2005. There it underwent restoration. All major mechanical components were removed and treated in order to preserve them. The interior and engine bay components were removed and refurbished and then re-installed. The exterior surfaces were cleaned and stabilized and re-treated with a “Zimmerit” paste created from a period recipe. Zimmerit had been applied in wartime to this Panther; residue of the original coating can be seen on the sections between the track and the upper hull. The restoration team reproduced many of the damaged or missing components in order to present the tank as it would likely have appeared on operations in 1944. After two years of labour by a dedicated team of volunteers it was unveiled to the public on 10 Januay 2008. (Source: CWM).

14) Wheatcroft Collection, Leicester, Britain

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 44

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 44
Serial Number: Chassis number “158134”.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


A Panther hull acquired in Russia is on its way to the Wheatcroft collection. It was originally blown up by its crew or enemy fire and what remains is just the lower hull and suspension.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Panther was previously identified as an Ausf G.

Ausf G

The Ausf G was the final production model of the Panther to be built. It saw two significant changes compared to the Ausf A. Firstly, the driver’s vision port was eliminated from the glacis plate and the driver’s two episcopes were replaced by a single rotating periscope. At the same time new hinged hatches with spring-assistance replaced the original hatches in the hull roof for the driver and operator. This was done because the earlier pivoted ones had been found to jam easily.
Secondly, the superstructure sides were altered. During development of the Jagdpanther tank destroyer it was found that by setting the hull sides of the Panther chassis at a more vertical angle it was possible to significantly increase the available interior space. This feature was adopted for the Ausf G, with the angle of the side plates increased from 30 to 40 degrees. It was also then possible to eliminate the separate pieces for the fuel tank compartments, so simplifying production. This produced the one-piece side plates, with the straight edge along the bottom of the sponsons, that is distinctive of the Ausf G. In order to improve ballistic protection the thickness of these side plates was increased from 40mm to 50mm.
A number of other detail changes were made, including the provision of armoured ammunition bins inside the sponsons, fitted with sliding armoured doors, to reduce the risk of fire. The ammunition stowage was increased from 79 to 82 rounds and a stronger method of attaching the Schürzen armour was used. The exhaust system of the Ausf G was the same as that of the Ausf D in appearance, but with the jack mounted vertically as on the Ausf A. From June 1944 the twin exhaust pipes were fitted with curved covers to conceal their glow at night, and the rear damper was dispensed with.
During production of the Ausf G a number of other changes were incorporated. From June 1944 three threaded Pilzen (Mushroom) sockets were welded to the turret roof. These held the base of a 2 tonne Befehlskran, a lifting frame for changing the engine and transmission. The engine deck air intake grills, previously a complicated waffle-pattern design, were replaced with simpler square grills. A raised housing for the crew heater replaced the low cover over the left air intake fan from October 1944. Some Ausf Gs, therefore, had just the grills changed while many featured both changes to the engine deck. Flame-trap exhausts were also introduced as developed for the Ausf F. An order of 9 September 1944 stated that the application of Zimmerit was to be stopped.
From the middle of 1944 onwards a new design of mantlet was introduced. The original curved one formed a shot trap and rounds were often deflected off it into the turret ring or through the roof of the driver’s compartment. The new design had a solid ‘chin’ with a vertical face cast into it along its lower half in order to prevent this occurring. In very late production vehicles it became standard practice to mount the cylindrical stowage container for the gun pull-through cleaning gear along the rear of the engine deck. It had previously been carried along the left side of the superstructure but had proved vulnerable to damage in that position. At least some early production Ausf Gs, however, appear to have carried the container in this new position. From April 1945 there was also a change of tool stowage, with the pioneer tools such as axe and shovel moved from the right superstructure side to the hull rear and engine deck. Other changes included the elimination of the AA machine-gun ring on the commander’s cupola from January 1945, and the addition of a new AA mount, and five small camouflage rings welded to each side of the turret, from March 1945 (source: L. Archer).

Model Id:
245
Manufacture:Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nürnberg (MAN) AG, Nürnberg, Bavaria, Middle Franconia, Germany (Primary manufacturer)
Daimler-Benz AG, Marienfelde, Berlin, Germany (Additional manufacturer)
Maschinenfabrik Niedersachsen-Hannover (MNH) GmbH, Linden, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany (Additional manufacturer)


15) The Tank Museum - Public Areas, Bovington, Britain

Number of Photos:
13
Sample Photo from Album Number 45

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 45
Serial Number: 129113.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Plaque fixed to glacis. German crosses painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a late-war brown and cream striped camouflage scheme (previously a green, brown and sand scheme, before that overall green).

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Ausf G has a plaque on its glacis plate that reads: “Built in 823 Armd Troops Wksp REME No.8 BAOR 1945”. It was number eight of the Panthers and Jagdpanthers built by the British and is fitted with swirl-cowl exhausts. This Panther was discovered at the Fighting Vehicle Research and Development Establishment at Chatham, and given to the Museum in 1952. It has the raised cover on the left side of the engine deck. It previously carried the turret number “331”. It now carries the turret number “R01”, indicative of a regimental headquarters command tank. However there is no evidence that it is a Panzerbefehlswagen and, given its provenance, it is highly unlikely that it would ever have been so converted. It has a final version cupola without AA MG ring but with mounts for an IR sight, and it has fittings for tools both on the hull side, and on the hull rear and engine deck (source: L. Archer).

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


(Correction: The Fighting Vehicle Research and Development Establishment (FVRDE), previously the Directorate of Tank Design, was located at Chertsey (Chobham Lane), not Chatham).
This Panther was put on the museum books in 1949. It is painted in a camouflage scheme is similar to that used on Panthers leaving the factory in the last months of the war – a basic undercoat of red with other colours rapidly applied. It was seen on Panthers of 5th Battalion, 25th Panzer Grenadier Division on the Eastern Front in February 1945.

16) Museé Des Blindés, Saumur, France

Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Album Number 46

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 46
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Ausf G was built by MAN in July 1944 and has the chassis number 120790. It carries Free French markings and was one of the two Panthers previously on display at Les Invalides, Paris. [Preserved Tanks in France: Number 176].

17) BWB Wehrtechnische Studiensammlung, Koblenz, Germany

Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Album Number 47

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 47
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Ausf G has a plaque on its glacis plate that reads: “Built in 823 Armd Troops Wksp REME No.6 BAOR 1945”. It was number six of the Panthers and Jagdpanthers built by the British. It is fitted with swirl-cowl exhausts, and is missing its engine cover plates. It has the same cupola and other late features as the Bovington example, including having fittings for tools both on the hull side, and on the hull rear and engine deck (source: L. Archer). It was transferred from the RMCS at Shrivenham in England. This was in 1985, in exchange for a Marder MICV. While on display there it had two large non-standard headlights fitted. It also had three long bolts and a metal cylinder welded to its glacis, of unknown purpose, which have since been removed. It spent some considerable time in storage at the Trier depot in the late 1980’s. The turret and main armament were restored by the Navy arsenal in Wilhelmshaven/Kiel, and the hull with all sub-assemblies, including its British gearbox, by the Wehrtechnische Dienststelle für Kraftfahrzeuge und Panzer (WTD 41) in Trier. It is now part of the Koblenz BWB collection and will be displayed once further restoration is complete. It is in running order. It has an imitation Zimmerit coating (although this was dropped from September 1944) and carries the turret number “801” and the name “Ulrihc”. (Photo: R. Besecke).

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


The vehicle name was mis-spelled in the original edition, it should be "Ulrike" (source: R. Besecke).

18) Private Collection (K. Flick), Solingen, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 48

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 48
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Panther has a plaque on its glacis plate identifying it as number four of the Panthers and Jagdpanthers built by the British. It is fitted with swirl-cowl exhausts. It was bought by a scrap merchant in a War Department sale in the 1950’s and remained in his scrap yard in Surrey, England, until it was discovered in October 1977. It was then recovered, in a badly damaged and incomplete state, and transported to Germany. It has since been restored to running order, although it is still missing some fittings.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


The scrapyard was in Cox Lane, Ewell.

19) Private Collection (B. Vogel), Langenzenn, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 49

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 49
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

A Panther was recovered from a river in Poland by Holger Veh in about 1992. It was then sold or exchanged with this collection which has a Panther turret. The rear of the turret was missing, and the hull had two unusual circular fittings on the right hand side. (Source: R. Fleming). The hull, without turret, tracks, fighting compartment roof, engine compartment roof or hatches, was recovered, upside down, on a flat bed trailer (source: Panther Model Fibel magazine via J. Harris).

20) Solitary Vehicle, Houffalize, Belgium

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 50

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 50
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

At the start of January 1945 a number of units involved in the Battle of the Bulge were caught in a salient near Houffalize, trapped by advancing Allied forces. On 14 January Hitler gave an order to start a withdrawal from the area. After 2 and 9 SS Panzer Divisions had withdrawn, it was the turn of 116 Panzer Division - the last remaining panzer unit. The Division retreated on 15 January and only just managed to escape before the US First and Third Armies met up outside Houffalize on 16 January.
This Ausf G was part of 116 Panzer Division and was lost in Houffalize. It originally carried the turret number “401”. It was found on 20 January 1945 lying in the Ourthe river after having fallen off the bridge on the road to La Roche. It is not known whether it drove off the bridge by accident or was abandoned on the bridge and later bulldozed aside. By 1952 it had been recovered from the river, with the dead crew still inside, and moved to the bank nearby. It is now on display in the middle of Houffalize beside the main road (N15), not far from where it had originally been abandoned. It had a coat of green paint for the 40th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge but was repainted in three-colour camouflage soon after. None of its markings, such as the 116 Panzer Division insignia and repainted turret numbers, are original. Its suspension is badly damaged. It is fitted with a number of different track shoes, including ones with straight edges, serrated edges, and snow cleats (source: Sherman Register).

21) Solitary Vehicle, Grandmenil, Belgium

Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Album Number 51

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 51
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Turret number “407”.

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


The area around the Belgian towns of Manhay and Grandmenil saw extensive fighting on 24, 25 and 26 December 1944 as part of the Battle of the Bulge. The 2 SS Panzer Division, part of 6 Panzer Armee, passed through Manhay on Christmas Day and captured Grandmenil, before attacking towards Erezée and Bomal. It was pushed back by American forces and Manhay and Grandmenil were recaptured on 27 December.
Seven of the Division’s Panthers were left scattered around the Bomal-Manhay-Grandmenil cross-roads, either destroyed, out of fuel or bogged in marshy ground. One was lost at the cross-roads, and later bulldozed off the road, another lost a track while reversing towards Manhay, and another was abandoned in a ditch to the north of the main road. Four, including this one, were lost in the field to the south of the road. This one is now on display on a small concrete plinth beside the main road (N494) in Grandmenil. Its suspension and many other parts are badly damaged and it is missing its muzzle-brake.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Panther is displayed on a plinth surrounded by a low chain fence on the roundabout at the edge of Grandmenil, in the direction of Manhay. This roundabout is at the intersection of the main road Rue d’Erezée (N807, previously referred to as the N494) and the Rue Alphonse Poncelet. It has been repainted in a three colour camouflage scheme. A label in front of the tank reads “PANTHER AUSF. G, 26/12/1944” commemorating the action in which it was lost.

22) Solitary Vehicle, Celles, Belgium

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 52

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 52
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


Early in the morning of 24 December 1944, during one of the German advances of the Battle of the Bulge, Kampfgruppe von Cochenhausen of 2 Panzer Division left a concentration area near the town of Conjeux in Belgium. At 6am, it approached the junction of the N510 and N48 roads near the town of Celles, south-east of Dinant, close to the point where Rommel had crossed the Meuse in May 1940. The leading Panther detonated a mine and was disabled in the field below the nearby château. It was severely damaged, losing most of its suspension, but was later moved adjacent to the cross-roads. It can still be seen there, in front of the café at the cross-roads, but is now little more than a hulk. It is missing many external parts, including its muzzle brake. There is a sign in front of it which states in French “Here was stopped the offensive of Von Rundstedt 24 December 1944”. The tank was last repainted early in 1994 by Belgian Army personnel (source: F. Derom).

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


Correct spelling for nearby town is Conjoux; the German concentration area was between Conjoux and Celles.

23) Liberty Park Oorlogsmuseum, Overloon, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
44
Sample Photo from Album Number 53

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 53
Serial Number: 128427, chassis number.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


In September 1944, during Operation Market Garden, the Allies planned to broaden their supply corridor from the Belgian border to Nijmegen, but they encountered stiff German resistance in the area of Overloon and Venray. A battle raged there for three weeks and included the only tank battle to take place in the Netherlands. This Panther Ausf G, with turret number “222”, had its right-hand suspension damaged. In June or July 1944 it was issued to 107 Armoured Brigade which was re-equipped and sent to Eindhoven, via Aachen, Roermond and Venlo, in September 1944. It was in action with this brigade at the Wilhelmina Canal bridge at Son and for the breakthrough of the Holland Corridor near Veghel (22nd-24th September 1944). During the battle of Overloon, where 107 Brigade made up the core of the German front, this particular tank was hit by a PIAT grenade of 2 Battalion, the East Yorkshire Regiment, and captured on 13 October 1944. The crew were killed.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Panther has Fgst Number 128427 and is presumed to have been produced by MNH in July 1944 (source: Panther1944.de). Its engine is missing; it was used to restore the SdKfz Associations’s Jagdpanther (source: P.-O. Buan/SPTR). This vehicle was previously displayed outside in the Overloon Museumpark but is now housed in an annexe of the main building. It underwent restoration during 1999.

24) U.S. Army Ordnance Museum, Aberdeen Proving Ground, USA

Number of Photos:
5
Sample Photo from Album Number 54

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 54
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Turret number “301”.

This is a late-production Ausf G; it has a chin on the mantlet and a raised fan-duct on the left side of the engine deck. The left side of its turret has been cut open and then patched up. It has flame trap exhausts and late version slatted engine grilles (source: L. Archer).

25) National Armor and Cavalry Museum, Fort Benning, USA

Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Album Number 55

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 55
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Ausf G was used against, and captured by, the Third US Army during World War II. It is now missing both tracks, all outer roadwheels and some inner roadwheels. It appears to be fitted with non-standard exhausts. Its engine and other parts were used in the restoration of the Museum’s Panther II tank. It has nine ‘kill rings’ marked on its barrel. It also carries the turret number “R03”, indicative of a regimental headquarters command tank. However there is no evidence that it is a Panzerbefehlswagen or that it was ever so converted. It is a very late version with camouflage rings on the turret sides and a cupola without the AA MG ring (source: L. Archer). An unconfirmed report has indicated that it may have been acquired by a private collector.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Panther is gutted inside; the interior deck plates are missing and only the torsion bars and gun remain (source: G. Redmon). In October 2010 it was transported from Fort Knox, Kentucky, to Fort Benning, Georgia.

26) Kubinka NIIBT Research Collection - Foreign Vehicles, Kubinka, Russia

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 56

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 56
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This example is fitted with Russian headlamps on both front mudguards. It shows signs of rust on the mantlet and turret sides.

27) Muzeum Orla Bialego, Skarżysko-Kamienna, Poland

Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Album Number 456

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 456
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Wreck.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry. These are the remains of a Panther hull. The turret and most of the superstructure are missing, and may indicate it suffered from a catastrophic internal explosion.