Preserved Tanks .com
    World Register of Surviving Historic Armoured Vehicles

Current Query: Full entry for the tank(s)/location: by Type and Update, Location & Update with Spare Photos, NavPix & Videos

Leopard Tank



Powered By Subgurim(http://googlemaps.subgurim.net).Google Maps ASP.NET

MAP CONTROLS: Use slider or mousewheel to zoom, and hold down left mouse button to drag.
KEY: Location markers are coloured from Green meaning exact to Red meaning gone or unknown (details here)

During the 1950s West Germany, France and Italy were equipped with American tanks, mostly M47s. These were approaching obsolescence and so the three nations agreed to draw up a specification for a new European tank. This specification appeared in 1957 and the defence ministries in France and West Germany then authorised the construction of prototypes. In France these were produced by the state-owned Atelier de Construction d’Issy les Moulineaux (AMX). In Germany they were produced by two consortia; Group A led by Porsche KG, and Group B under the Warnecke office of Ruhrstahl. Rheinmetall and Wegmann were given the contract to develop a turret design common to the two German vehicles.
Four German prototypes of the new vehicle, known as Kampfpanzer Standard, were delivered for trials in 1961, two from Group A in January and two from Group B in September. Following trilateral trials late in that year a number of changes were made to the specification. A further twenty-six Group A vehicles were ordered, with turrets designed by Wegmann, along with six from Group B, with turrets by Rheinmetall. At this point the French decided to develop their own gun whilst, following further trials at Trier and Meppen, the Group B design was abandoned after only two more vehicles had been completed. During 1963 the Germans decided to choose a purely German design and authorised production of the Group A design from July of that year. The first examples of this tank, now known as Leopard, left the production line in September. Meanwhile France went its own way, culminating in production of the AMX30, whilst Italy first decided to build the American M60 under licence and then to buy the Leopard.

Group A Prototypes

The first two examples of the Group A vehicle to be built were designated ‘Series I’ prototypes and were distinguished by having the driver’s position on the left side of the hull. They also appear to have had vertical exhaust grills covering just half the height of the engine compartment superstructure sides. One turret had a Rheinmetall 105mm gun and rangefinder, the other the British L7 105mm gun and 0.50in ranging machine gun.
The ‘Series II’ prototype vehicles had the driver’s compartment moved to the right side of the hull to make way for ammunition stowage for the gun. This simplified the stowage since the main armament, now standardised on the British L7 series 105mm gun, was loaded from the left. The ‘12.7mm’ ranging MG was retained, and the exhaust grills now extended the full height of the engine compartment sides. Numerous improvements incorporated into these vehicles included increased armour protection, a ten cylinder diesel engine coupled to a new transmission, a modified fire control system and improved suspension. Twenty-six were produced at about the time the Group B design was abandoned. They were sent to a special trials unit, Panzerlehrbataillon 93, at the Munsterlager Panzertruppenshule 2 in the autumn of 1962. The ranging MG was abandoned after these trials.
The next prototypes were pre-production examples with many improvements. They were known as ‘Series III’ vehicles and fifty were ordered. They reverted to the use of a rangefinder instead of a ranging machine gun and had modified turret stowage racks. They also now had horizontal rather than vertical louvers in the exhaust grills and had a prominent infra-red searchlight fixed at the top centre of the gun mantlet.

Model Id:
680
Manufacture:Porsche AG, Stuttgart (Prime contractor - multiple manufacturers)


1) Defence College of Management and Technology, Shrivenham, Britain

Number of Photos:
15
Sample Photo from Album Number 298

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 298
Serial Number: L02.
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “7217” painted on front right mud flap. “AFVW” (‘AFV Wing’) insignia painted on forward turret sides. Bundeswehr crosses painted on turret sides.

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Leopard was acquired from the Military Vehicle Engineering Establishment. It is a Series III vehicle. It is believed that it may have been acquired in exchange for two Chieftains in the mid 1960s along with the Leopard displayed at Bovington Tank Museum. It was sectioned by Royal Ordnance apprentices and is now displayed with the interior open to view (source: J. Harris).

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


Its number “L02” indicates that it was built by Luther & Jordan of Braunschweig who built seventeen examples; “7217” was the number assigned to it while being tested at MVEE (source: Bovington Museum Vehicle Record). It is shown cut away through the centre of the hull, turret and engine bay, and has key internal components colour coded. It has uniformed mannequins in the driver, gunner, loader and commander crew positions.

2) Museé Des Blindés, Saumur, France

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 299

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 299
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Leopard appears to have a Series III turret, without a searchlight, on a Series II chassis. It was a gift from the German Army. It is displayed in the German section of the new General Estienne Hall which was opened on 20 April 1994. It is in running order and has taken part in Carrousel dynamic displays.

3) Panzermuseum, Munster, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 300

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 300
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a Series III vehicle but is not fitted with an IR searchlight. It was built in October 1963.

4) BWB Wehrtechnische Studiensammlung, Koblenz, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 301

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 301
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a Series I example of the Leopard built by the Group A manufacturers, distinguished by having the driver’s position on the left side of the hull. It is believed to be currently in storage at Meppen.

5) Auto und Technik Museum, Sinsheim, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 302

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 302
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a Series II prototype that appears to have a Series I turret armed with the Rheinmetall 105mm gun. It has the registration number Y 547207 and turret number “407”.

6) Auto und Technik Museum, Sinsheim, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 303

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 303
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a Series II prototype that appears to have a Series I turret armed with the British L7 105mm gun.

7) Auto und Technik Museum, Sinsheim, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 304

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 304
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Series II prototype is missing its turret.

8) Schulz Kaserne, Munster, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 305

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 305
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a Series II prototype of the Leopard. It has an early production turret without a bustle and appears to be fitted with an anti-aircraft MG mounting ring above the commander’s cupola. It is on display inside the main gate of Schulz Kaserne, on the outskirts of Munster.

9) Lutz Kaserne, Munster, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 306

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 306
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a Series II prototype of the Leopard. It has an early production turret without a bustle. It is on display inside the main gate of Lutz Kaserne, on the outskirts of Munster.

10) Pansarmuseet, Axvall, Sweden

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 307

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 307
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This Leopard appears to have Series I turret on a Series II chassis.

11) National Armor and Cavalry Museum, Fort Benning, USA

Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Album Number 308

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 308
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Leopard appears to have Series II turret on a Series III chassis. It was used as a test vehicle at the German Proving Grounds at Meppen, Germany, before being donated by the Federal German Army to the museum in 1976. It is in running order.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard was moved by transporter from Fort Knox to Fort Benning on 5 November 2010.

12) The Tank Museum - Public Areas, Bovington, Britain

Number of Photos:
8
Sample Photo from Album Number 297

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 297
Serial Number: J03.
Registration: “Y-209859” (German) painted on glacis. Also “02 SP 60” (British).
Name:
Other Identification: “7218” painted on front right mud flap. “L03” painted on glacis plate. Standard unit code number “91872110”. German crosses painted on hull sides.

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Leopard has the registration numbers Y-209859 (German) and 02SP60 (British experimental), and the serial number J03. It also has the standard unit code number 91872110, and carries the number 7218. It is a Series III vehicle and was one of two vehicles acquired by the MVEE, Chobham Lane, Chertsey, Surrey, in 1965/66. This was in exchange for two Chieftains at a time when the Dutch were undertaking MBT trials. It arrived at the museum in June 1970. It is believed that it was borrowed at some point by Royal Ordnance to prove a retro-fit conversion of the 105mm gun (source: J. Harris). The other Leopard is reputed to have gone as a hard target to a firing range after testing, but it is likely to be the one on display at the RMCS, Shrivenham.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard is displayed on a section of bridge from a bridgelayer tank. It was manufactured in 1962.
Its number “L03” indicates that it was built by Luther & Jordan of Braunschweig who built seventeen examples; “7218” was the number assigned to it while being tested at MVEE. In the summer of 1989 it was fitted with the Royal Ordnance 105mm Improved Weapons System gun for a trial fit but it was subsequently returned to its original condition with the 105mm L7. The tank was also painted in a version of the German Fleckentarnanstrich camouflage scheme later adopted as the standard NATO pattern by some countries. (Source: Museum Vehicle Record).

Group B Prototypes

Group B prototypes are identified by having six roadwheels per side instead of the seven of the Group A vehicles, by the lack of exhaust grilles on the sides of the engine compartment, and by the slope of the engine compartment roof from the sides to the centre.

Model Id:
690
Manufacture:Henschel und Sohn, Kassel, Nordhessen, Germany (Primary manufacturer)
Rheinstahl-Hanomag, Germany (Additional manufacturer)


13) BWB Wehrtechnische Studiensammlung, Koblenz, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 309

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 309
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is prototype B2 of the Leopard and was acquired from the Bundeswehr. It was previously stored at Meppen.

Production Vehicles

Production examples of the Leopard are distinguished by a number of changes, including having the searchlight moved to the left side of the gun mantlet. This was done to avoid back-scatter of light into the sights. During production a number of small changes were made, for example on later vehicles the exhaust grills with their horizontal louvers no longer had any vertical bars. The first production vehicle was handed over to the Federal German Army in September 1965 and since then the type has been adopted by at least nine other countries. It was a very successful design built in large numbers, more than 4000 including exports, and has formed the basis for a family of specialised vehicles. Italy not only imported 200 Leopards but also produced 720 under licence. These were manufactured by OTO Melara and differ from the original design in having a different intercom system, aiming optics and secondary armament (MG 42/59 machine-guns). OTO Melara has since produced a tank for export, the OF 40, which is a development of the Leopard design.
Further German development of the Leopard design, known as Leopard 1 since the advent of the Leopard 2, has produced many variants. Leopard 1A1 has a stabiliser for the main armament, bazooka plates (with a distinctive scalloped edge), a thermal sleeve for the gun, a bow vane for deep wading, new tracks with replacement rubber pads, and a modified deep wading kit. Leopard 1A1A1 has additional armour plates bolted on to the turret sides and mantlet while 1A1A2 also has a PZB 200 night sight. The 1A1, 1A1A1 and 1A1A2 were rebuilds of original production vehicles but a number of vehicles of new designs were produced from the early 1970’s. Leopard 1A2 has a stronger cast steel turret, improved NBC (Nuclear, Bacteriological and Chemical) protection, and night vision equipment. The 1A3 variant has a new spaced-armour turret while the 1A4 also has new fire control equipment. The 1A5 is a further rebuild of older vehicles with a new fire control system.
The Leopard 1 has been exported to many countries, including Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Norway and Turkey. Almost every country that has ordered some has specified modifications to suit its own specific needs. For example, the Netherlands acquired 468 Leopard 1s from 1968. These Leopard 1 (NL) vehicles had different radios, smoke dischargers and exhaust covers. Also, the 7.62mm MG was replaced by a 12.7mm Browning at the commander’s station. At a later date they were all fitted with an American Honeywell gun stabilisation system, modified optical sights and a new driver’s periscope. More recently, they have been rebuilt by 574 Tankwerkplaats at Leusden with appliqué armour, similar to that used on the 1A1A1 and supplied by Blohm and Voss of Germany. They also have new track skirts and a Dutch configuration fire control system, and have been redesignated Leopard 1-V for Verbeterd (Improved).
A published report of a Leopard in the Russian collection at Kubinka has not been confirmed.

Model Id:
700
Manufacture:Wegmann & Co, Kassel, Nordhessen, Germany (Turret manufacturer)
Krauss-Maffei GmbH, Munich, Germany (Prime contractor and vehicle assembly)


14) Museé Des Blindés, Saumur, France

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 310

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 310
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This 1A1A2 was acquired in 1994 and has the registration number Y-327664. It is displayed in the German section of the new General Estienne Hall (note that it has been described elsewhere as a 1A3).

15) Auto und Technik Museum, Sinsheim, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 312

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 312
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This 1A1A2 has the turret number “617” and appears to have the registration number Y 121003.

16) Panzermuseum, Munster, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 313

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 313
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a 1A1A4. (Source: R. Besecke).

17) Panzermuseum, Munster, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 314

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 314
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a 1A2A1. (Source: R. Besecke).

18) Panzermuseum, Munster, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 315

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 315
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a 1A4. (Source: R. Besecke).

19) Motor Technica Museum, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 316

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 316
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a 1A1A4 and it is on loan from the BWB collection at Koblenz (source: R. Fleming).

20) Panzer Battalion 84, Lüneburg, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 317

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 317
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This 1A5 is on display in Lüneburg, south-east of Hamburg. (Source: W. Schneider).

Leopard 1A1



Model Id:
702
Manufacture:Wegmann & Co, Kassel, Nordhessen, Germany (Turret manufacturer)
Krauss-Maffei GmbH, Munich, Germany (Prime contractor and vehicle assembly)


21) Armeemuseum, Dresden, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 311

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 311
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “327” stencilled in white on left turret side. Bundeswehr cross painted on left turret side. Painted overall in a green, black and brown camouflage scheme.

This 1A1A2 carries the turret number “327”.

22) The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Britain

Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Album Number 1960

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 1960
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: German crosses painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a green, brown and black camouflage scheme.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry. This is a Leopard 1A1A2. It is in running order and was one of three Leopards that took part in Tankfest 2009. It is currently in storage but was previously displayed in the Tamiya Hall.

23) Fort IX Czerniaków, Mokotów, Poland

Number of Photos:
3
Sample Photo from Album Number 401

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 401
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: “827” painted in black on right turret side. Bundeswehr crosses painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a pale green, black and brown camouflage scheme.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry. This Leopard originally came from the museum at Dresden. It is believed to be a Leopard 1A1A4. It was at the Muzeum Wolska Polskiego from about 2004-2006. It is in running order.

24) Generalfeldmarschall-Rommel-Kaserne, Augustdorf, Germany

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 1673

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 1673
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Bundeswehr crosses painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a green, black and brown camouflage scheme.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard 1A1A1 is displayed on a low sloped ramp.

Leopard 1A3


Leopard C1

Leopard 1A3 fitted with the Belgian SABCA computerised fire-control system. The Canadian order comprised 114 MBTs, six bridgelayers and eight armoured recovery vehicles.

Model Id:
705
Manufacture:Wegmann & Co, Kassel, Nordhessen, Germany (Turret manufacturer)
Krauss-Maffei GmbH, Munich, Germany (Prime contractor and vehicle assembly)


25) Base Borden Military Museum, Canadian Forces Base Borden, Canada

Number of Photos:
18
Sample Photo from Album Number 2407

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2407
Serial Number: 15092: “15092” stamped into lower right glacis.
Registration:
Name: “MILNER” painted on turret sides.
Other Identification:

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard has a prominent plate fixed to the glacis (this states that it has a potentially hazardous Chemical Agent Resistant Coating and gives appropriate safety instructions).

26) Garrison Petawawa Military Museums, Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Canada

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 2582

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2582
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: White edged black maple leaf painted on turret sides.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard C1 has a hull upgraded for a C2 but with a C1 turret swapped. It is believed this turret was used as a gunnery simulator at the Armour School in Gagetown and was not sent off to Australia or used in Canada as a target. (Source: Trackjam Models).

Leopard 1A4



Model Id:
706
Manufacture:Wegmann & Co, Kassel, Nordhessen, Germany (Turret manufacturer)
Krauss-Maffei GmbH, Munich, Germany (Prime contractor and vehicle assembly)


27) Schweizerische Militärmuseum, Full, Switzerland

Number of Photos:
7
Sample Photo from Album Number 833

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 833
Serial Number:
Registration: “Y-947809” painted on nose and left rear hull.
Name:
Other Identification: “0024605” previously visible painted on left side of nose. Bundeswehr crosses painted on turret sides.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry.

28) Canadian War Museum, LeBreton Flats, Canada

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 2489

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2489
Serial Number:
Registration: 73-12422 (source: Tango24B/Forums.army.ca)
Name:
Other Identification: Maple leaf emblem painted on turret sides. Painted overall in a green, black and brown camouflage scheme.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This was a Leopard 1A3 (not a C1) with modifications for the EMES 18 sight and muzzle reference system. It was obtained by DND somewhere around 1993-1995. It has had the open stowage basket added to the rear of the turret; this modification was seen on later C1s when the MEXAS mounts were added in about 1996. The tank had as its first holding unit Valcartier in 1993 and then with DND in 1995. It is suspected that it may have been a trial tank used to determine if upgrading the C1 with the EMES 18 was feasible at the time or to wait until the 1A5 turrets came available for the C2 development. The only German Leopard 1A3 known to have been modified with the EMES 18 sight was a German trial tank sent to Thailand for hot weather testing in the 1980s but it is not known if it is the same tank. It is known that this tank was moved to Gagetown in 1997 and then to 202 Wksp in 2001, and then disposed of out of 25 CFSD in 2003. The tank was at one time inside the Museum but currently is believed to be stowed outside awaiting some new batteries to get it fired up again. (Source: Tango24B/Forums.army.ca).
According to ‘Lance Wiebe’: “I had 422 to play with for a couple of years while I was the IG Tm WO. The story that I was given on the tank was that it was a test 1A3 that was never issued to the German Army, but was used as a test bed at Krauss Maffei. At one point in its career, it was modified with the EMES 18 and a relaxed view PERI sight; similar to the Leo 2A5/6. It was (supposedly) the predecessor to the Danish update when they took their Leo 1A3 and installed the EMES 18. It also was (again, supposedly) the first Leopard 1 with the turret electric drive that became the norm for the TED upgrade, as opposed to the more experimental types that trialled before it came along. When you jump on top, you can still see where they mounted the relaxed viewer PERI. I have no idea what type they mounted, but it was toward the rear of the turret, similar to the Leo 2A5/6. I was told it was given to us at the time, because we gave KM a tank in trade that we bought during the Leopard C2 project. It took a lot of work, but I finally received permission to play with it on the ranges to determine a good boresight/zeroing range. It was a good excuse to play with the EMES! The problem was that the barrel had something like 4800 EFC's on it. At any rate, after numerous inspections, it was cleared to fire. I first tried zeroing at 1500, with TP. I had about a 25cm grouping, which was tighter than any C1 that I had when I had the K19 gunnery Leopards. I was really impressed with the EMES! Of course, the thermal and the stabilized sight was fantastic as well.” (Source: Forums.army.ca).
According to the transfer paperwork from KMW to the Canadian Military this Leopard is classified as a 1A4 (source: A. Sewards/AFVNDB).

Leopard 1A5


Leopard 1-V

Leopard 1V is an 1A1A4 with an EMES 12A3 AFSL-2 FCS. Used by Netherlands, identified by Dutch smoke dischargers high up towards back of turret sides.

Model Id:
708
Manufacture:


29) Stichting Nationaal Militair Museum, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 2335

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2335
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry.

30) Regiment Huzaren van Sytzama, Oirschot, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 2184

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2184
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard is used for recovery training (source: L. Delsing).

31) Regiment Huzaren van Sytzama, Oirschot, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 2185

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2185
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard is preserved at Building 250 (source: L. Delsing).

32) Cavaleriemuseum, Bernhardkazerne, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
19
Sample Photo from Album Number 2183

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2183
Serial Number: 12227 (source: L. Delsing).
Registration: KU-92-26 (Dutch): “KU-92-26” painted on nose.
Name: “PRINS ALEXANDER” painted on turret sides.
Other Identification: “41C” painted on right glacis and left hull rear. “A20” painted on left glacis and right hull rear. “NL” painted on glacis and side stowage boxes. Dutch flag painted on glacis and hull rear.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard was previously at Legerplaats Seedorf in Germany. The marking “41C” indicates 41st Tank Battalion and “A20” indicates A Squadron, 2nd Platoon, platoon commanders’s tank. (Source: L. Delsing/AFVNDB).

33) Cavaleriemuseum, Bernhardkazerne, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
14
Sample Photo from Album Number 2322

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2322
Serial Number: 12237 (source: L. Delsing).
Registration: KU-92-40 (Dutch): “KU 92 40” painted on nose and hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “A[()]59” painted on right glacis and left hull rear. “A 43” painted on left glacis and right hull rear. “NL” painted on centre glacis and side stowage boxes. Dutch flag painted on glacis and hull rear. Unit insignia and “175 JAAR” painted in orange on rear stowage box.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard is painted in the colours of A Squadron, 59th Tank Battalion (A59). The marking “A43” indicates A Squadron, 4th platoon, 3rd tank – the deputy platoon commander’s tank. (Source: L. Delsing).

34) Cavaleriemuseum, Bernhardkazerne, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Album Number 2334

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2334
Serial Number: 12259 (source: L. Delsing).
Registration: KU-92-58 (Dutch): “KU92-58” painted on nose and hull rear.
Name: “B-ARCO” (previously “Balthasar”) painted on turret sides.
Other Identification: “B3” painted on left glacis and right hull rear. Unit markings painted on mantlet sides and right side stowage box. “NL” painted on side stowage boxes and glacis. Painted overall in a green, brown and black camouflage scheme.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry. This Leopard was previously at the Du Moulin barracks at Soesterberg. Then it was moved to Legerplaats Seedorf, Germany. It is painted in the markings of B Company, 101 Tank Battalion, tactical number “B03”. It is painted in a three colour camouflage scheme though the Dutch did not use this scheme on Leopards. The name is pronounced “Barco” which is short for a Bacardi rum – cola mix. (Source: L. Delsing/AFVNDB).

35) Cornfield Firing Range, Vliehors, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 318

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 318
Serial Number: Chassis number “12337”.
Registration: KU-93-35: “KU 93-35” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Leopard 1-V is on display in the barracks of the Dutch Army’s 11th Tank Battalion (source: T. Royall).

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard was transferred to be used as a hard target at the Vlieland range (source: L. Delsing).

36) Cavaleriemuseum, Bernhardkazerne, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
20
Sample Photo from Album Number 319

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 319
Serial Number: 12339 (source: L. Delsing).
Registration: KU-93-37 (Dutch): “KU-93-37” painted on nose and hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “B 36” painted on left of glacis and right hull rear. “104 CV” and Dutch flag painted on right of glacis and left hull rear. “NL” painted on centre of glacis and on side stowage boxes.

Text in original Preserved German Tanks publication:


This Leopard 1-V is on display in the Dutch Army barracks (source: T. Royall).

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard is painted in the colours of 104th Recce Battalion. The marking “B36” indicates B Squadron, tactical number 36. It is in running order and took part in the ‘Hello Goodbye’ event to mark the closure of the Soesterberg Air Base on 13 June 2009. It also took part in the Museumdag 2010 event at Amersdoorf on 10 April 2010.

37) Liberty Park Oorlogsmuseum, Overloon, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
21
Sample Photo from Album Number 1707

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 1707
Serial Number: 12340: “NL12340” stamped into right of glacis (source: M. Krauss/AFVNDB).
Registration: KU-93-38: “KU-93-38” painted on nose and hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “MDNL5?” stamped into left of glacis (source: M. Krauss/AFVNDB). “12E” painted on turret rear stowage rack. “NL” painted on glacis and side stowage boxes. Various insignia painted on glacis and hull rear.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard is a 1A1A1 (1-V); it is displayed with a mannequin in the commander’s cupola.
The marking “12E” indicates A-eskadron (squadron), 2e peloton (platoon), and E (platoon sergeant’s) tank respectively. Originally Dutch Leopards were Leopard 1A1 Baulos (batch) 4; 1-V (verbeterd, improved) was a version with extra armour and some specific Dutch modifications. This example came from Zwijndrecht and is in excellent condition. (Source: L. Delsing).

38) Cavaleriemuseum, Bernhardkazerne, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 2349

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2349
Serial Number: 12370 (source: L. Delsing).
Registration: KU-93-68 (Dutch): “KU-93-68” painted on nose.
Name:
Other Identification: “NL” painted on glacis.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry. This Leopard was first reported in December 2007 (source: L. Delsing/AFVNDB). It is stored under a tarpaulin with its turret reversed.

39) Cavaleriemuseum, Bernhardkazerne, The Netherlands

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 2350

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2350
Serial Number: 12396 (source: L. Delsing).
Registration: KU-93-94 (Dutch, source: L. Delsing).
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry. This Leopard was first reported in July 2010 (source: L. Delsing/AFVNDB).

Leopard C2



Model Id:
709
Manufacture:Wegmann & Co, Kassel, Nordhessen, Germany (Turret manufacturer)
Krauss-Maffei GmbH, Munich, Germany (Prime contractor and vehicle assembly)


40) Royal Military College of Canada, Canadian Forces Base Kingston, Canada

Number of Photos:
10
Sample Photo from Album Number 2568

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2568
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


This Leopard is displayed on a concrete pad. It has a plaque that reads “LEOPARD C2 DONUM ALUMNORUM ANNI MCMLXXV” (‘Gift of Alumni of the year 1975’).

41) Canadian War Museum, LeBreton Flats, Canada

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 2465

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 2465
Serial Number:
Registration: 78-85049 (source: CHAFVR).
Name:
Other Identification:

42) The Tank Museum - Public Areas, Bovington, Britain

Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Album Number 1981

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 1981
Serial Number: 18054: chassis
0076B: turret
Registration: 78-85095: “78-85095” painted on left hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “23C” painted on turret and hull rear. “CARC” painted on hull rear. Black maple leaf painted on rangefinder blanking plates. Painted overall green.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry.

43) The Tank Museum - Reserve Collection, Bovington, Britain

Number of Photos:
2
Sample Photo from Album Number 1982

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 1982
Serial Number: 18016 (chassis)
0020A (turret).
Registration: 78-85137: “78-85137” painted on left hull rear.
Name:
Other Identification: “23A” painted on hull sides and rear. “137” painted on thermal sleeve near muzzle. White-edged black maple leaf painted on rangedfinder blanking plates. Hull painted in a green, brown and black camouflage (previously overall green), turret painted overall green.

Text in Preserved German Tanks Update:


New entry.

Leopard Improved

At about the same time as the Kampfpanzer 70 design was undergoing testing in Germany and America this prototype of a ‘Leopard Improved’ was being built (its designation is Erprobungsträger mit 3-achs-stabilisiertem Turm). Its most significant feature was a new design of turret that was operated largely automatically and utilised many sophisticated technical features. The turret was fully stabilised and mounted a standard 105mm gun plus an automatic 30mm gun as secondary armament. The chassis was also modified, being wider and powered by a 1000hp engine.

Model Id:
710
Manufacture:Porsche AG, Stuttgart (Unconfirmed)


44) BWB Wehrtechnische Studiensammlung, Koblenz, Germany

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 320

Click here or on the image for this tank's profile page

Unique ID: 320
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This test vehicle was previously in storage at Meppen. It carries the number “1631” on the glacis plate and right-hand mud flap.