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Type 95 Ha-Go Light Tank



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Design work on the Type 95 was begun in 1933 with the aim of producing a light tank with speed and mobility combined with a relatively heavy armament. Production began in 1935 (2595) and eventually more than a thousand were built by Mitsubishi. The Type 95 had a hand-operated turret carrying a 37mm gun and was well liked by its crews. It played an important role in Japanese victories in China, Malaysia, Philippines and the Pacific islands. Production continued until 1943 by which time it was seriously outclassed by enemy equipment.

Model Id:
4200
Manufacture:Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Limited, Nagasaki, Japan (Sole manufacturer 1935-1943)


1) The Tank Museum - Public Areas, Bovington, Britain

Number of Photos:
12
Sample Photo from Album Number 26

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Unique ID: 26
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Other Identification: “663” and white star painted on hull rear. Tactical marking of three white vertical bars painted on turret rear. Japanese flag painted on nose. Painted overall in a green, brown and yellow camouflage scheme.

2) Fort DeRussy, Honolulu, USA

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 27

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Unique ID: 27
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This Ha-Go has recently been repainted plain green but was previously displayed in a camouflage scheme with rising sun markings.

3) Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor, Fort Knox, USA

Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Album Number 28

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Unique ID: 28
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This tank was captured by US forces during World War II. At one time it was in storage (see first photograph), largely dismantled and awaiting restoration; before that it was displayed outside in Keyes Park. It has since been restored and put on display (see second photograph) with its hatches open and the inside lit to allow viewing of the interior details (photo: E. Coffer). It is displayed in a camouflage scheme with the tactical number “20” on the side; it is missing its main armament and gun shield.

4) U.S. Army Ordnance Museum, Aberdeen Proving Ground, USA

Number of Photos:
4
Sample Photo from Album Number 29

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Unique ID: 29
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This tank was captured on Attu during the Pacific campaign of World War II.

5) National Guard Military Museum, Fort Withycombe, Clackamas, USA

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 30

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Unique ID: 30
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This is one of two Type 95s that were recovered from a US Navy aircraft desert bombing run in Nevada. It was in the best condition so it is planned to be reconstructed by using parts ‘cannibalised’ from the other. The turrets of both vehicles are in covered storage along with their engines. Most of the vehicles in this collection are kept in storage.

6) Kubinka NIIBT Research Collection - Foreign Vehicles, Kubinka, Russia

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 588

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Unique ID: 588
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7) National Guard Military Museum, Fort Withycombe, Clackamas, USA

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 787

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Unique ID: 787
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8) Ropkey Armor Museum, Crawfordsville, USA

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 788

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Unique ID: 788
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This Type 95 has been moved to the Indiana museum (which is the home of the Ropkey Collection) for restoration. It was previously at the Quantico Marine Corps Air-Ground Museum in Virginia. Before that it was on display at the Navy Memorial Museum in the Navy Yard at Washington, D.C. It is in good condition, although it is currently minus its engine, and has had various external parts roughly refabricated (e.g. front mudguards and muffler).

9) Admiral Nimitz State Historical Park, Fredericksburg, USA

Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Album Number 789

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Unique ID: 789
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This Ha-Go is now part of the Nimitz collection (source: A. Takizawa). It is in a very poor condition, missing its wheels, tracks, suspension and many other parts.

10) Melbourne Tank Museum, Narre Warren, Australia

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 790

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Unique ID: 790
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This Ha-Go was captured by Australian troops at Milne Bay, New Guinea, during August 1942. Photographic evidence and the official Australian War History indicate that two tanks were landed and that both were Type 95s. The action there was the first defeat of Japanese land forces during the Second World War. The principal Australian Army Units involved in the action were the 18th Infantry Brigade (AIF) and the 7th Infantry Brigade (AMF). After their capture, both Japanese tanks were shipped to Australia for technical assessment, and then transported (originally from north Queensland by rail flatcar) to various centres around the country in aid of War Bond drives. Eventually, after the end of the War, they were sold at a Commonwealth Disposals auction to Hughes Trading Company in Coburg, Victoria, where they were left to languish in a yard. The guns of both tanks had been removed by the Japanese before capture and, although the guns were recovered by Australian forces, they were never returned to the tanks.
In the mid-1970s, John Belfield (the owner of the Melbourne Tank Museum) managed to purchase one of the tanks from Hughes and has since restored it; during restoration, the names of nine soldiers from the capturing units were found scratched into its side. It is now on display with a three-colour camouflage scheme in a diorama that depicts the tank at the time of its capture, along with contemporary photographs and news reports. Although it is missing its gun and right hand track, a fake gun has recently been fitted.

11) National Museum of the Marine Corps, Triangle, USA

Number of Photos:
6
Sample Photo from Album Number 1141

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Unique ID: 1141
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Other Identification: Painted overall in a three colour camouflage scheme.

12) Poklonnaya Gora Victory Park, Moscow, Russia

Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Album Number 2403

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Unique ID: 2403
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